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Patient experience of lasting negative effects of psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in secondary mental health care services: A national cross-sectional study

Patient experience of lasting negative effects of psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in secondary mental health care services: A national cross-sectional study
Patient experience of lasting negative effects of psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in secondary mental health care services: A national cross-sectional study

Background: Patients who undergo psychological treatment can report both negative and positive effects, but evidence of factors influencing the likelihood of negative effects is limited. Aims: To identify aspects of the organisation and delivery of secondary care psychological treatment services that are associated with patient experiences of negative effects. Method: Cross-sectional survey of people with anxiety and depression who ended psychological treatment delivered by 50 NHS trusts in England. Respondents were asked about how their treatment was organised and delivered and whether they experienced lasting negative effects. Results: Of 662 respondents, 90 (14.1%) reported experiencing lasting negative effects. People over the age of 65 were less likely than younger respondents to report negative effects. There was an association between reporting neutral or negative effects and not being referred at what respondents considered to be the right time (OR = 1.712, 95% CI = 1.078–2.726), not receiving the right number of sessions (OR = 3.105, 95% CI = 1.934–4.987), and not discussing progress with their therapist (OR 2.063, 95% CI = 1.290–3.301). Conclusions: One in seven patients who took part in this survey reported lasting negative effects from psychological treatment. Steps should be taken to prepare people for the potential for negative experiences of treatment, and progress reviewed during therapy in an effort to identify and prevent negative effects.

1471-244X
McQuaid, A
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Farquharson, L
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Shah, P
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Quirk, Alan
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Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Crawford, M.
8442a93d-670d-470c-a44b-65d7d9bc7080
McQuaid, A
70ed4626-39e7-45bc-929f-f83769f944bb
Farquharson, L
a3f350d0-3fc1-4cfb-97dd-f2e3e64c1669
Shah, P
ca014260-2c4b-42c6-a99c-9a04dde33883
Quirk, Alan
68fbb952-64ad-4c2d-995b-881d4bc7a6be
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Crawford, M.
8442a93d-670d-470c-a44b-65d7d9bc7080

McQuaid, A, Farquharson, L, Shah, P, Quirk, Alan, Baldwin, David and Crawford, M. (2021) Patient experience of lasting negative effects of psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in secondary mental health care services: A national cross-sectional study. BMC Psychiatry, 21 (1), [578]. (doi:10.1186/s12888-021-03588-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Patients who undergo psychological treatment can report both negative and positive effects, but evidence of factors influencing the likelihood of negative effects is limited. Aims: To identify aspects of the organisation and delivery of secondary care psychological treatment services that are associated with patient experiences of negative effects. Method: Cross-sectional survey of people with anxiety and depression who ended psychological treatment delivered by 50 NHS trusts in England. Respondents were asked about how their treatment was organised and delivered and whether they experienced lasting negative effects. Results: Of 662 respondents, 90 (14.1%) reported experiencing lasting negative effects. People over the age of 65 were less likely than younger respondents to report negative effects. There was an association between reporting neutral or negative effects and not being referred at what respondents considered to be the right time (OR = 1.712, 95% CI = 1.078–2.726), not receiving the right number of sessions (OR = 3.105, 95% CI = 1.934–4.987), and not discussing progress with their therapist (OR 2.063, 95% CI = 1.290–3.301). Conclusions: One in seven patients who took part in this survey reported lasting negative effects from psychological treatment. Steps should be taken to prepare people for the potential for negative experiences of treatment, and progress reviewed during therapy in an effort to identify and prevent negative effects.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 October 2021
Published date: 17 November 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 452949
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/452949
ISSN: 1471-244X
PURE UUID: a886ee63-066b-413c-9d9a-c7f1f1c14181
ORCID for David Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

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Date deposited: 07 Jan 2022 11:41
Last modified: 30 Oct 2023 02:37

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Contributors

Author: A McQuaid
Author: L Farquharson
Author: P Shah
Author: Alan Quirk
Author: David Baldwin ORCID iD
Author: M. Crawford

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