The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Is rapid scientific publication also high quality? Bibliometric analysis of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers

Is rapid scientific publication also high quality? Bibliometric analysis of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers
Is rapid scientific publication also high quality? Bibliometric analysis of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers

The impact of COVID-19 has underlined the need for reliable information to guide clinical practice and policy. This urgency has to be balanced against disruption to journal handling capacity and the continued need to ensure scientific rigour. We examined the reporting quality of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers using a bibliometric analysis examining reporting quality and risk of bias (RoB) amongst 250 top scoring Altmetric Attention Score (AAS) COVID-19 research papers between January and April 2020. Method-specific RoB tools were used to assess quality. After exclusions, 84 studies from 44 journals were included. Forty-three (51%) were case series/studies, and only one was an randomized controlled trial. Most authors were from institutions based in China (n = 44, 52%). The median AAS and impact factor was 2015 (interquartile range [IQR] 1,105–4,051.5) and 12.8 (IQR 5–44.2) respectively. Nine studies (11%) utilized a formal reporting framework, 62 (74%) included a funding statement, and 41 (49%) were at high RoB. This review of the most widely disseminated COVID-19 studies highlights a preponderance of low-quality case series with few research papers adhering to good standards of reporting. It emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of research and the increasingly vital responsibility that journals have in ensuring high-quality publications.

altmetrics, coronavirus Infections, COVID-19, pandemics, publication impact, quality
0953-1513
568-577
Khatter, Amandeep
e23e235c-6404-4334-985b-9590b3956b1b
Naughton, Michael
235a6edf-2c7c-44b7-a4c4-6180430ff514
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Redmond, Patrick
7b922ad8-670e-4d59-a215-732523ff4cb1
Khatter, Amandeep
e23e235c-6404-4334-985b-9590b3956b1b
Naughton, Michael
235a6edf-2c7c-44b7-a4c4-6180430ff514
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Redmond, Patrick
7b922ad8-670e-4d59-a215-732523ff4cb1

Khatter, Amandeep, Naughton, Michael, Dambha-Miller, Hajira and Redmond, Patrick (2021) Is rapid scientific publication also high quality? Bibliometric analysis of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers. Learned Publishing, 34 (4), 568-577. (doi:10.1002/leap.1403).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The impact of COVID-19 has underlined the need for reliable information to guide clinical practice and policy. This urgency has to be balanced against disruption to journal handling capacity and the continued need to ensure scientific rigour. We examined the reporting quality of highly disseminated COVID-19 research papers using a bibliometric analysis examining reporting quality and risk of bias (RoB) amongst 250 top scoring Altmetric Attention Score (AAS) COVID-19 research papers between January and April 2020. Method-specific RoB tools were used to assess quality. After exclusions, 84 studies from 44 journals were included. Forty-three (51%) were case series/studies, and only one was an randomized controlled trial. Most authors were from institutions based in China (n = 44, 52%). The median AAS and impact factor was 2015 (interquartile range [IQR] 1,105–4,051.5) and 12.8 (IQR 5–44.2) respectively. Nine studies (11%) utilized a formal reporting framework, 62 (74%) included a funding statement, and 41 (49%) were at high RoB. This review of the most widely disseminated COVID-19 studies highlights a preponderance of low-quality case series with few research papers adhering to good standards of reporting. It emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of research and the increasingly vital responsibility that journals have in ensuring high-quality publications.

Text
1-s2.0-S0738399121004808-main - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 1 June 2021
Keywords: altmetrics, coronavirus Infections, COVID-19, pandemics, publication impact, quality

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 453404
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/453404
ISSN: 0953-1513
PURE UUID: 36a1a2bd-7179-48e7-8076-8e15a05be290
ORCID for Hajira Dambha-Miller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0175-443X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Jan 2022 18:23
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:26

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Amandeep Khatter
Author: Michael Naughton
Author: Patrick Redmond

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×