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Reproductive traits and population dynamics of benthic invertebrates indicate episodic recruitment patterns across an Arctic polar front

Reproductive traits and population dynamics of benthic invertebrates indicate episodic recruitment patterns across an Arctic polar front
Reproductive traits and population dynamics of benthic invertebrates indicate episodic recruitment patterns across an Arctic polar front
Climate-induced changes in the ocean and sea ice environment of the Arctic are beginning to generate major and rapid changes in Arctic ecosystems, but the effects of directional forcing on the persistence and distribution of species remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the reproductive traits and population dynamics of the bivalve Astarte crenata and sea star Ctenodiscus crispatus across a north–south transect that intersects the polar front in the Barents Sea. Both species present large oocytes indicative of short pelagic or direct development that do not differ in size–frequency between 74.5 and 81.3º latitude. However, despite gametogenic maturity, we found low frequencies of certain size classes within populations that may indicate periodic recruitment failure. We suggest that recruitment of A. crenata could occur periodically when conditions are favorable, while populations of C. crispatus are characterized by episodic recruitment failures. Pyloric caeca indices in C. crispatus show that food uptake is greatest at, and north of, the polar front, providing credence to the view that interannual variations in the quantity and quality of primary production and its flux to the seafloor, linked to the variable extent and thickness of sea ice, are likely to be strong determinants of physiological fitness. Our findings provide evidence that the distribution and long-term survival of species is not only a simple function of adaptive capacity to specific environmental changes, but will also be contingent on the frequency and occurrence of years where environmental conditions support reproduction and settlement.
functional biogeography, gametogenesis, interannual variability, life history, reproductive plasticity
2045-7758
6900-6912
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Godbold, Jasmin
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Grange, Laura
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Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Godbold, Jasmin
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Grange, Laura
8de65684-8e14-4cc2-89d1-ca20322714e4

Reed, Adam, Godbold, Jasmin, Solan, Martin and Grange, Laura (2021) Reproductive traits and population dynamics of benthic invertebrates indicate episodic recruitment patterns across an Arctic polar front. Ecology and Evolution, 11 (11), 6900-6912. (doi:10.1002/ece3.7539).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Climate-induced changes in the ocean and sea ice environment of the Arctic are beginning to generate major and rapid changes in Arctic ecosystems, but the effects of directional forcing on the persistence and distribution of species remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the reproductive traits and population dynamics of the bivalve Astarte crenata and sea star Ctenodiscus crispatus across a north–south transect that intersects the polar front in the Barents Sea. Both species present large oocytes indicative of short pelagic or direct development that do not differ in size–frequency between 74.5 and 81.3º latitude. However, despite gametogenic maturity, we found low frequencies of certain size classes within populations that may indicate periodic recruitment failure. We suggest that recruitment of A. crenata could occur periodically when conditions are favorable, while populations of C. crispatus are characterized by episodic recruitment failures. Pyloric caeca indices in C. crispatus show that food uptake is greatest at, and north of, the polar front, providing credence to the view that interannual variations in the quantity and quality of primary production and its flux to the seafloor, linked to the variable extent and thickness of sea ice, are likely to be strong determinants of physiological fitness. Our findings provide evidence that the distribution and long-term survival of species is not only a simple function of adaptive capacity to specific environmental changes, but will also be contingent on the frequency and occurrence of years where environmental conditions support reproduction and settlement.

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Ecology and Evolution - 2021 - Reed - Reproductive traits and population dynamics of benthic invertebrates indicate - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 17 March 2021
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 May 2021
Published date: 16 June 2021
Keywords: functional biogeography, gametogenesis, interannual variability, life history, reproductive plasticity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 453507
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/453507
ISSN: 2045-7758
PURE UUID: 801536db-c4bf-4f97-816d-8b4db3c5e129
ORCID for Adam Reed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2200-5067
ORCID for Jasmin Godbold: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5558-8188
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574
ORCID for Laura Grange: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9222-6848

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Date deposited: 18 Jan 2022 18:05
Last modified: 25 Feb 2023 02:44

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