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A spatiotemporal analysis of cattle herd movement in relation to drinking-water sources: implications for Cryptosporidium control in rural Kenya

A spatiotemporal analysis of cattle herd movement in relation to drinking-water sources: implications for Cryptosporidium control in rural Kenya
A spatiotemporal analysis of cattle herd movement in relation to drinking-water sources: implications for Cryptosporidium control in rural Kenya

Given the increasing evidence that domestic contact with livestock is a risk factor for child diarrhoea in low- and middle-income countries, there have been calls for greater quantification of human-livestock contact in such countries. This study aimed to quantify seasonality in cattle proximity to domestic water sources and household compounds and develop a preliminary landscape model of faecal deposition by cattle. A total of 120 cattle in smallholder herds in the Asembo area of Siaya County, Kenya, were tracked over 1 week in April 2018 to July 2018 and November 2018 to February 2019 using GPS tracking devices. Dung deposition and behaviour were observed among 33 cattle from these herds over 185.4 hours. Mean cattle home ranges were small at 3.78 km 2 and 5.85 km 2 in the wet and dry seasons, respectively. There were significant differences between seasons in home range size, distance travelled from the household, and time spent tethered, but not in the time spent at domestic water sources or home range overlap with other herds. On average, 0.76 dung deposition events/hour were observed, with higher frequency in bulls. Variation in cattle proximity to household compounds and water sources did not account for seasonal variation in child diarrhoea in this population. The preliminary landscape model of faecal deposition by cattle could be further developed to inform interventions for safe separation of livestock and people, such as fencing and separate water troughs.

Animal movement, Cryptosporidium, Kenya, Landscape, Livestock, Water contamination
0944-1344
34314-34324
Floyd, Jessica
b54620d7-9154-4807-a9a7-60d87001b0dc
Kwoba, Emmah
25a80128-b537-43d4-a313-25026767b7d4
Thumbi, Samuel
74b28f8d-fafb-432f-8129-394944f2ed1a
Okotto-Okotto, Joseph
a8cb5abe-ee03-4c93-978b-b02a02350e26
Wanza, Peggy
fe7bfcdb-f5fd-492d-a60c-efe97fffb3b0
Wardrop, Nicola A
8f3a8171-0727-4375-bc68-10e7d616e176
Yu, Weiyu
4cca6f0a-badb-4f1c-8b38-da29ba0b9e09
Wright, Jim
94990ecf-f8dd-4649-84f2-b28bf272e464
Floyd, Jessica
b54620d7-9154-4807-a9a7-60d87001b0dc
Kwoba, Emmah
25a80128-b537-43d4-a313-25026767b7d4
Thumbi, Samuel
74b28f8d-fafb-432f-8129-394944f2ed1a
Okotto-Okotto, Joseph
a8cb5abe-ee03-4c93-978b-b02a02350e26
Wanza, Peggy
fe7bfcdb-f5fd-492d-a60c-efe97fffb3b0
Wardrop, Nicola A
8f3a8171-0727-4375-bc68-10e7d616e176
Yu, Weiyu
4cca6f0a-badb-4f1c-8b38-da29ba0b9e09
Wright, Jim
94990ecf-f8dd-4649-84f2-b28bf272e464

Floyd, Jessica, Kwoba, Emmah, Thumbi, Samuel, Okotto-Okotto, Joseph, Wanza, Peggy, Wardrop, Nicola A, Yu, Weiyu and Wright, Jim (2022) A spatiotemporal analysis of cattle herd movement in relation to drinking-water sources: implications for Cryptosporidium control in rural Kenya. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 29 (23), 34314-34324. (doi:10.1007/s11356-021-17888-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Given the increasing evidence that domestic contact with livestock is a risk factor for child diarrhoea in low- and middle-income countries, there have been calls for greater quantification of human-livestock contact in such countries. This study aimed to quantify seasonality in cattle proximity to domestic water sources and household compounds and develop a preliminary landscape model of faecal deposition by cattle. A total of 120 cattle in smallholder herds in the Asembo area of Siaya County, Kenya, were tracked over 1 week in April 2018 to July 2018 and November 2018 to February 2019 using GPS tracking devices. Dung deposition and behaviour were observed among 33 cattle from these herds over 185.4 hours. Mean cattle home ranges were small at 3.78 km 2 and 5.85 km 2 in the wet and dry seasons, respectively. There were significant differences between seasons in home range size, distance travelled from the household, and time spent tethered, but not in the time spent at domestic water sources or home range overlap with other herds. On average, 0.76 dung deposition events/hour were observed, with higher frequency in bulls. Variation in cattle proximity to household compounds and water sources did not account for seasonal variation in child diarrhoea in this population. The preliminary landscape model of faecal deposition by cattle could be further developed to inform interventions for safe separation of livestock and people, such as fencing and separate water troughs.

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Accepted/In Press date: 27 November 2021
Published date: May 2022
Additional Information: © 2021. The Author(s).
Keywords: Animal movement, Cryptosporidium, Kenya, Landscape, Livestock, Water contamination

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454147
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454147
ISSN: 0944-1344
PURE UUID: b72468ba-3ada-4c17-abab-0c5a5314a29c
ORCID for Jim Wright: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8842-2181

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2022 17:43
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Jessica Floyd
Author: Emmah Kwoba
Author: Samuel Thumbi
Author: Joseph Okotto-Okotto
Author: Peggy Wanza
Author: Weiyu Yu
Author: Jim Wright ORCID iD

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