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Parafoveal processing of repeated words during reading

Parafoveal processing of repeated words during reading
Parafoveal processing of repeated words during reading
In an eye tracking experiment during reading, we examined the Repetition Effect whereby words that are repeated in the same paragraph receive shorter fixation durations. Target words that were either high- or low-frequency words and of which the parafoveal preview was either correct or with all letters replaced were embedded three times in the same paragraph. Shorter fixation times and higher skipping rates were observed for high-frequency compared to low- frequency words, words for which the parafoveal preview was correct versus incorrect and as the word was being repeated more often. An interaction between frequency and repetition indicated that the reduction in fixation times due to repetition was more pronounced for low- frequency words. We also observed influences of word repetition on parafoveal processing as repeated words were skipped more often. An interaction between parafoveal preview and repetition indicated an absent repetition effect when the preview was incorrect but this effect was short-lived as it was restricted to the first fixation duration on the target word.
1069-9384
1451-1460
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Chan Seem, Robert
e2b1b9da-5ed5-4e7c-add3-140d9cbff1ce
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Chan Seem, Robert
e2b1b9da-5ed5-4e7c-add3-140d9cbff1ce

Drieghe, Denis and Chan Seem, Robert (2022) Parafoveal processing of repeated words during reading. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 29 (4), 1451-1460.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In an eye tracking experiment during reading, we examined the Repetition Effect whereby words that are repeated in the same paragraph receive shorter fixation durations. Target words that were either high- or low-frequency words and of which the parafoveal preview was either correct or with all letters replaced were embedded three times in the same paragraph. Shorter fixation times and higher skipping rates were observed for high-frequency compared to low- frequency words, words for which the parafoveal preview was correct versus incorrect and as the word was being repeated more often. An interaction between frequency and repetition indicated that the reduction in fixation times due to repetition was more pronounced for low- frequency words. We also observed influences of word repetition on parafoveal processing as repeated words were skipped more often. An interaction between parafoveal preview and repetition indicated an absent repetition effect when the preview was incorrect but this effect was short-lived as it was restricted to the first fixation duration on the target word.

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Drieghe & Chan Seem (in press) - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 December 2021
Published date: 2 September 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454168
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454168
ISSN: 1069-9384
PURE UUID: ee9ec65f-d721-4c42-ace8-f2e55009771b
ORCID for Denis Drieghe: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9630-8410

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2022 17:48
Last modified: 07 Jan 2023 05:02

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Contributors

Author: Denis Drieghe ORCID iD
Author: Robert Chan Seem

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