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Effect of grain size on strength and strain rate sensitivity in metals

Effect of grain size on strength and strain rate sensitivity in metals
Effect of grain size on strength and strain rate sensitivity in metals
The effect of the grain size on the mechanical properties of metallic materials has been a topic of significant interest for researchers and industry. For many decades a relationship defining the mechanical strength proportional to the inverse of the square root of the grain size has been widely accepted despite some reports of deviations from this behavior. Nevertheless, the initial explanations for this relationship, based mainly on the activation of slip systems by dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries, have provided essentially no predictive capability. Here we show that a physically-based model for grain boundary sliding predicts, in excellent agreement with experimental data, the flow stress for plastic deformation for a broad range of materials using the fundamental properties of each material over a wide range of grain sizes and testing conditions. This mechanism also successfully predicts the reported enhanced strain rate sensitivity in ultrafine and nanocrystalline materials at different temperatures.
deformation mechanisms, mechanical properties, nanocrystalline materials, strain rate sensitivity, ultrafine-grained materials
0022-2461
Figueiredo, Roberto B.
cdc0ae83-425e-43ac-be02-3fb382c35981
Langdon, Terence G
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Figueiredo, Roberto B.
cdc0ae83-425e-43ac-be02-3fb382c35981
Langdon, Terence G
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Figueiredo, Roberto B. and Langdon, Terence G (2022) Effect of grain size on strength and strain rate sensitivity in metals. Journal of Materials Science. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The effect of the grain size on the mechanical properties of metallic materials has been a topic of significant interest for researchers and industry. For many decades a relationship defining the mechanical strength proportional to the inverse of the square root of the grain size has been widely accepted despite some reports of deviations from this behavior. Nevertheless, the initial explanations for this relationship, based mainly on the activation of slip systems by dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries, have provided essentially no predictive capability. Here we show that a physically-based model for grain boundary sliding predicts, in excellent agreement with experimental data, the flow stress for plastic deformation for a broad range of materials using the fundamental properties of each material over a wide range of grain sizes and testing conditions. This mechanism also successfully predicts the reported enhanced strain rate sensitivity in ultrafine and nanocrystalline materials at different temperatures.

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Figueiredo_paper_JMS2022 - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 10 March 2023.
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Accepted/In Press date: 10 January 2022
Keywords: deformation mechanisms, mechanical properties, nanocrystalline materials, strain rate sensitivity, ultrafine-grained materials

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454344
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454344
ISSN: 0022-2461
PURE UUID: 082b03f2-7c16-4d7d-8214-90e8dc6feff4
ORCID for Terence G Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Feb 2022 17:52
Last modified: 01 Feb 2023 02:37

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Contributors

Author: Roberto B. Figueiredo

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