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Influence of ground motion type on nonlinear seismic behaviour and fragility of corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete bridge piers

Influence of ground motion type on nonlinear seismic behaviour and fragility of corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete bridge piers
Influence of ground motion type on nonlinear seismic behaviour and fragility of corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete bridge piers
Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) bridge piers including a rectangular and a circular section are considered. The influence of corrosion damage, non-stationary characteristics of ground motions, and cross-sectional shape on nonlinear dynamic behaviour, failure mechanism and failure probability of these piers is investigated. An advanced modelling technique, capable of modelling coupled influence of inelastic buckling and low-cycle fatigue degradation of reinforcement, is employed to simulate the nonlinear structural behaviour of the piers. The considered bridge piers with various mass loss ratios (as a measure of corrosion) are subjected to a series of static pushover analyses and incremental dynamic analyses under three different suites of ground motions such as, Far-Field (FF), Near-Field With Pulse (NFWP), and Near-Field with No Pulse (NFNP). Furthermore, an advanced matching algorithm is used to investigate the effect of non-stationary content of near-field earthquake records including the presence of large pulses in ground motion time series on the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of the corrosion-damaged RC bridge piers. Finally, fragility curves are developed for each corroded bridge pier with different corrosion ratios subjected to each ground motion suite. Analyses results show that the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged bridge piers significantly depends on the cross-sectional shape and ground motion type. It is concluded that while both of the piers with slight corrosion levels are much more vulnerable under NFWP ground motions than those under FF and NFNP ground motions; the probability of failure of the extremely corroded bridge piers is approximately the same regardless of ground motion type.
Corrosion, Failure mechanism, Ground motion type, Incremental dynamic analysis, Low-cycle fatigue, Seismic fragility
1570-761X
1489-1518
Dizaj, Ebrahim Afsar
b7f5e0f1-52f5-457d-aaaa-f31d95f97e19
Kashani, Mohammad
d1074b3a-5853-4eb5-a4ef-7d741b1c025d
Dizaj, Ebrahim Afsar
b7f5e0f1-52f5-457d-aaaa-f31d95f97e19
Kashani, Mohammad
d1074b3a-5853-4eb5-a4ef-7d741b1c025d

Dizaj, Ebrahim Afsar and Kashani, Mohammad (2022) Influence of ground motion type on nonlinear seismic behaviour and fragility of corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete bridge piers. Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering, 20 (3), 1489-1518. (doi:10.1007/s10518-021-01297-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) bridge piers including a rectangular and a circular section are considered. The influence of corrosion damage, non-stationary characteristics of ground motions, and cross-sectional shape on nonlinear dynamic behaviour, failure mechanism and failure probability of these piers is investigated. An advanced modelling technique, capable of modelling coupled influence of inelastic buckling and low-cycle fatigue degradation of reinforcement, is employed to simulate the nonlinear structural behaviour of the piers. The considered bridge piers with various mass loss ratios (as a measure of corrosion) are subjected to a series of static pushover analyses and incremental dynamic analyses under three different suites of ground motions such as, Far-Field (FF), Near-Field With Pulse (NFWP), and Near-Field with No Pulse (NFNP). Furthermore, an advanced matching algorithm is used to investigate the effect of non-stationary content of near-field earthquake records including the presence of large pulses in ground motion time series on the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of the corrosion-damaged RC bridge piers. Finally, fragility curves are developed for each corroded bridge pier with different corrosion ratios subjected to each ground motion suite. Analyses results show that the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged bridge piers significantly depends on the cross-sectional shape and ground motion type. It is concluded that while both of the piers with slight corrosion levels are much more vulnerable under NFWP ground motions than those under FF and NFNP ground motions; the probability of failure of the extremely corroded bridge piers is approximately the same regardless of ground motion type.

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EADizajMMKashani_BEE_R2 - Accepted Manuscript
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e-pub ahead of print date: 14 January 2022
Published date: 14 January 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. Copyright: Copyright 2022 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
Keywords: Corrosion, Failure mechanism, Ground motion type, Incremental dynamic analysis, Low-cycle fatigue, Seismic fragility

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Local EPrints ID: 454472
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454472
ISSN: 1570-761X
PURE UUID: 24a1dd15-99d8-4a76-9bfe-4dfda9ba38f4
ORCID for Mohammad Kashani: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0008-0007

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Date deposited: 10 Feb 2022 17:39
Last modified: 14 Jan 2023 05:01

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Author: Ebrahim Afsar Dizaj

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