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Engagement, clinical outcomes and therapeutic process in online mindfulness for psychosis groups delivered in routine care

Engagement, clinical outcomes and therapeutic process in online mindfulness for psychosis groups delivered in routine care
Engagement, clinical outcomes and therapeutic process in online mindfulness for psychosis groups delivered in routine care
Objectives
There is growing evidence for the benefit of mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) for people with psychosis. However, research is yet to evaluate the clinical benefit of delivering MBI groups online. We examine engagement, clinical outcomes, participant experience and therapeutic process of delivering therapy groups online in routine clinical practice.

Methods
The study used an uncontrolled pre-post design to examine engagement, therapeutic benefits (depression, anxiety, beliefs about voices) and group process in a 12-session online mindfulness group for individuals with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis with current distressing voices. Qualitative data on participant experience of online group therapy were analysed using Thematic Analysis.

Results
17/21 participants (81%) completed one of three consecutively run therapy groups. For completers there were significant reductions pre-post in depression, anxiety, beliefs about voices and voice-related negative affect, with medium to large effect sizes. There were individuals showing reliable and clinically significant improvements in each clinical outcome, and none showing reliable or clinically significant deterioriation. Participants’ rankings of the importance of different group therapeutic factors were very similar to those observed in face-to-face mindfulness for psychosis groups. Qualitative analysis of participant feedback identified three themes: ‘experience of online delivery’, ‘therapeutic benefits’ and ‘feeling connected to people in the group’.

Conclusions
Findings in relation to therapy engagement, clinical benefits, participant experience and group process offer encouragement that online delivery of mindfulness for psychosis groups may be a useful addition to mental health services for people with distressing voices.
group therapy, mindfulness, online, psychosis, schizophrenia
1476-0835
467-476
Ellett, Lyn
96482ea6-04b6-4a50-a7ec-ae0a3abc20ca
Dannahy, Laura
58a94ca4-120d-4c27-8737-52c4b809010d
Chadwick, Paul
8575f844-9b6e-4184-b31f-e99fa92b0e43
Ellett, Lyn
96482ea6-04b6-4a50-a7ec-ae0a3abc20ca
Dannahy, Laura
58a94ca4-120d-4c27-8737-52c4b809010d
Chadwick, Paul
8575f844-9b6e-4184-b31f-e99fa92b0e43

Ellett, Lyn, Dannahy, Laura and Chadwick, Paul (2022) Engagement, clinical outcomes and therapeutic process in online mindfulness for psychosis groups delivered in routine care. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 95 (2), 467-476. (doi:10.1111/papt.12382).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
There is growing evidence for the benefit of mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) for people with psychosis. However, research is yet to evaluate the clinical benefit of delivering MBI groups online. We examine engagement, clinical outcomes, participant experience and therapeutic process of delivering therapy groups online in routine clinical practice.

Methods
The study used an uncontrolled pre-post design to examine engagement, therapeutic benefits (depression, anxiety, beliefs about voices) and group process in a 12-session online mindfulness group for individuals with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis with current distressing voices. Qualitative data on participant experience of online group therapy were analysed using Thematic Analysis.

Results
17/21 participants (81%) completed one of three consecutively run therapy groups. For completers there were significant reductions pre-post in depression, anxiety, beliefs about voices and voice-related negative affect, with medium to large effect sizes. There were individuals showing reliable and clinically significant improvements in each clinical outcome, and none showing reliable or clinically significant deterioriation. Participants’ rankings of the importance of different group therapeutic factors were very similar to those observed in face-to-face mindfulness for psychosis groups. Qualitative analysis of participant feedback identified three themes: ‘experience of online delivery’, ‘therapeutic benefits’ and ‘feeling connected to people in the group’.

Conclusions
Findings in relation to therapy engagement, clinical benefits, participant experience and group process offer encouragement that online delivery of mindfulness for psychosis groups may be a useful addition to mental health services for people with distressing voices.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 January 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 January 2022
Published date: June 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Authors. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Psychological Society.
Keywords: group therapy, mindfulness, online, psychosis, schizophrenia

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454513
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454513
ISSN: 1476-0835
PURE UUID: 00ab66e1-8c02-47af-a778-f60678f0f682
ORCID for Lyn Ellett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6051-3604

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Feb 2022 17:56
Last modified: 28 Jan 2023 03:02

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Contributors

Author: Lyn Ellett ORCID iD
Author: Laura Dannahy
Author: Paul Chadwick

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