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Standard maps of chromosome 10

Standard maps of chromosome 10
Standard maps of chromosome 10


To achieve consensus more exact definitions of genetical maps are required, of which standard, comprehensive and skeletal might be some. A standard genetic map gives distance from pter in centimorgans (cM), uses the international nomenclature for assigned loci, is sex-specific, and allows as well as possible for interference and typing errors. A standard physical map gives distance from pter in megabases (Mb). A standard map is called comprehensive if it aims to include all syntenic loci, and skeletal if it is limited to loci whose order is well supported. Loci with established order are called skeletal, and are used to define regional assignments of other loci.

These principles are illustrated using the CEPH data for chromosome 10. Map lengths by multiple 2-point analysis under supported interference are in good agreement with other evidence, but multipoint mapping gives a substantial overestimate. There are currently 21 loci in the skeletal genetic map and 40 loci in the comprehensive genetic map. From these data, cytogenetic assignments, and partial genetic maps the physical location has been estimated for 85 loci. MEN2A is in a region close to the centromere in which male recombination per megabase is much reduced. Order of DNA markers in this densely mapped region has not been determined, and therefore the exact location of MEN2A is uncertain, although it is likely to lie between D10S34 and D10S30 and close to D10S11.
0003-4800
235-251
Morton, Newton
c668e2be-074a-4a0a-a2ca-e8f51830ebb7
Collins, Andrew
7daa83eb-0b21-43b2-af1a-e38fb36e2a64
Morton, Newton
c668e2be-074a-4a0a-a2ca-e8f51830ebb7
Collins, Andrew
7daa83eb-0b21-43b2-af1a-e38fb36e2a64

Morton, Newton and Collins, Andrew (1990) Standard maps of chromosome 10. Annals of Human Genetics, 54 (3), 235-251. (doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.1990.tb00381.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract



To achieve consensus more exact definitions of genetical maps are required, of which standard, comprehensive and skeletal might be some. A standard genetic map gives distance from pter in centimorgans (cM), uses the international nomenclature for assigned loci, is sex-specific, and allows as well as possible for interference and typing errors. A standard physical map gives distance from pter in megabases (Mb). A standard map is called comprehensive if it aims to include all syntenic loci, and skeletal if it is limited to loci whose order is well supported. Loci with established order are called skeletal, and are used to define regional assignments of other loci.

These principles are illustrated using the CEPH data for chromosome 10. Map lengths by multiple 2-point analysis under supported interference are in good agreement with other evidence, but multipoint mapping gives a substantial overestimate. There are currently 21 loci in the skeletal genetic map and 40 loci in the comprehensive genetic map. From these data, cytogenetic assignments, and partial genetic maps the physical location has been estimated for 85 loci. MEN2A is in a region close to the centromere in which male recombination per megabase is much reduced. Order of DNA markers in this densely mapped region has not been determined, and therefore the exact location of MEN2A is uncertain, although it is likely to lie between D10S34 and D10S30 and close to D10S11.

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Published date: 1 July 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 454653
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/454653
ISSN: 0003-4800
PURE UUID: 6ca021b4-dc51-4394-bda6-7ef554458200
ORCID for Andrew Collins: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7108-0771

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Date deposited: 18 Feb 2022 17:30
Last modified: 19 Feb 2022 02:32

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Contributors

Author: Newton Morton
Author: Andrew Collins ORCID iD

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