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Non-asimov explanations regulating AI through transparency

Non-asimov explanations regulating AI through transparency
Non-asimov explanations regulating AI through transparency
An important part of law and regulation is demanding explanations for actual and potential failures. We ask questions like: What happened (or might happen) to cause this failure? And why did (or might) it happen? These are disguised normative questions - they really ask what ought to have happened, and how the humans involved ought to have behaved. To answer the normative questions, law and regulation seeks a narrative explanation, a story. At present, we seek these kinds of narrative explanation from AI technology, because as humans we seek to understand technology's working through constructing a story to explain it. Our cultural history makes this inevitable - authors like Asimov, writing narratives about future AI technologies like intelligent robots, have told us that they act in ways explainable by the narrative logic which we use to explain human actions and so they can also be explained to us in those terms. This is, at least currently, not true. This work argues that we can only solve this problem by working from both sides. Technologists will need to find ways to tell us stories which law and regulation can use. But law and regulation will also need to accept different kinds of narratives, which tell stories about fundamental legal and regulatory concepts like fairness and reasonableness that are different from those we are used to.
cs.CY, K.5.0
Reed, Chris
e6798f01-9625-4305-978f-b333b8b7346f
Grieman, Keri
43da77da-4b99-41c5-b7cd-6d468293a2bc
Early, Joseph
fd4e9e4c-9251-474d-a9cf-12157a9f2f73
Reed, Chris
e6798f01-9625-4305-978f-b333b8b7346f
Grieman, Keri
43da77da-4b99-41c5-b7cd-6d468293a2bc
Early, Joseph
fd4e9e4c-9251-474d-a9cf-12157a9f2f73

Reed, Chris, Grieman, Keri and Early, Joseph (2021) Non-asimov explanations regulating AI through transparency. Nordic Yearbook of Law and Informatics. (doi:10.48550/arXiv.2111.13041).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An important part of law and regulation is demanding explanations for actual and potential failures. We ask questions like: What happened (or might happen) to cause this failure? And why did (or might) it happen? These are disguised normative questions - they really ask what ought to have happened, and how the humans involved ought to have behaved. To answer the normative questions, law and regulation seeks a narrative explanation, a story. At present, we seek these kinds of narrative explanation from AI technology, because as humans we seek to understand technology's working through constructing a story to explain it. Our cultural history makes this inevitable - authors like Asimov, writing narratives about future AI technologies like intelligent robots, have told us that they act in ways explainable by the narrative logic which we use to explain human actions and so they can also be explained to us in those terms. This is, at least currently, not true. This work argues that we can only solve this problem by working from both sides. Technologists will need to find ways to tell us stories which law and regulation can use. But law and regulation will also need to accept different kinds of narratives, which tell stories about fundamental legal and regulatory concepts like fairness and reasonableness that are different from those we are used to.

Text
2111.13041v1 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 November 2021
Additional Information: 26 pages. Also submitted as a pre-print to SSRN, see http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3970518
Keywords: cs.CY, K.5.0

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 455135
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/455135
PURE UUID: 953e91c9-62cc-4f91-b91a-e6fcb6cef845

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2022 17:51
Last modified: 10 Mar 2022 17:51

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Contributors

Author: Chris Reed
Author: Keri Grieman
Author: Joseph Early

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