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Consultation, consent, and the silencing of indigenous communities

Consultation, consent, and the silencing of indigenous communities
Consultation, consent, and the silencing of indigenous communities
Over the past few decades, Indigenous communities have successfully campaigned for greater inclusion in decision-making processes that directly affect their lands and livelihoods. As a result, two important participatory rights for Indigenous peoples have now been widely recognized: the right to consultation and the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC). Although these participatory rights are meant to empower the speech of these communities—to give them a proper say in the decisions that most affect them—we argue that the way these rights have been implemented and interpreted sometimes has the opposite effect, of denying them a say or ‘silencing’ them. In support of this conclusion we draw on feminist speech act theory to identify practices of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary group silencing that arise in the context of consultation with Indigenous communities.
0264-3758
781-798
Townsend, Leo
237e8b4b-4cdd-4c54-af13-0ae93856d8a4
Townsend, Dina Lupin
526ee2bc-7f3d-4a01-9d21-358a8999e364
Townsend, Leo
237e8b4b-4cdd-4c54-af13-0ae93856d8a4
Townsend, Dina Lupin
526ee2bc-7f3d-4a01-9d21-358a8999e364

Townsend, Leo and Townsend, Dina Lupin (2020) Consultation, consent, and the silencing of indigenous communities. Journal of Applied Philosophy, 37 (5), 781-798. (doi:10.1111/japp.12438).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the past few decades, Indigenous communities have successfully campaigned for greater inclusion in decision-making processes that directly affect their lands and livelihoods. As a result, two important participatory rights for Indigenous peoples have now been widely recognized: the right to consultation and the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC). Although these participatory rights are meant to empower the speech of these communities—to give them a proper say in the decisions that most affect them—we argue that the way these rights have been implemented and interpreted sometimes has the opposite effect, of denying them a say or ‘silencing’ them. In support of this conclusion we draw on feminist speech act theory to identify practices of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary group silencing that arise in the context of consultation with Indigenous communities.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 April 2020
Published date: 11 December 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 455642
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/455642
ISSN: 0264-3758
PURE UUID: d7aebf1b-f2d8-40e8-895f-4bdd2f90091d
ORCID for Dina Lupin Townsend: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6531-8066

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2022 16:56
Last modified: 25 Aug 2022 02:07

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Contributors

Author: Leo Townsend
Author: Dina Lupin Townsend ORCID iD

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