The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Assessing the effectiveness of social network interventions for adults with a diagnosis of mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of impact

Assessing the effectiveness of social network interventions for adults with a diagnosis of mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of impact
Assessing the effectiveness of social network interventions for adults with a diagnosis of mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of impact

BACKGROUND: Social connections have been linked to the genesis and amelioration of mental health problems and thus have potential therapeutic value.

PURPOSE: To identify the current evidence base, assess risk of bias and synthesise findings on the effectiveness of social network interventions for people with mental health problems.

METHODS: Electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus) and grey literature databases were systematically searched from inception to October 2021 using free text syntax combining synonyms for 'mental health problems' and 'social network interventions'. Articles were eligible for inclusion if they reported data from randomised controlled trials on the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve social networks for adults (18+) with mental health problems. Papers were independently reviewed for inclusion with conflicts resolved through consensus. Included papers were quality assessed and data extracted and synthesized narratively. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool.

RESULTS: Nine studies randomising 2226 participants were included. Four focused on those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or psychosis, one on major depressive disorder and four included all types of mental health diagnoses. The current evidence base is of unclear quality. However, interventions which focused on supporting social activities appear to hold the most promise for enhancing social networks. Data on cost-effectiveness and research acceptability were limited, but suggest the potential economic feasibility of and acceptability for evaluating these interventions.

CONCLUSION: There is emerging evidence that social network interventions can be effective in improving social connections for people with mental health problems. However, further evaluations with robust methodological approaches are required to inform evidence-based recommendations for health services.

Mental health, Narrative synthesis, Social networks, Systematic review
0933-7954
907-925
Brooks, Helen
0056a0c8-f97a-4215-99e1-652291fcd6eb
Devereux-Fitzgerald, Angela
9de26d0b-03aa-4543-9c51-63103a3cf0c2
Richmond, Laura
8a3e5162-cf1e-4740-95c4-ea50dcac9fa3
Bee, Penny
76e373ee-12be-4966-8bb6-8157e1dc037d
Lovell, Karina
5d35b37c-4545-4ba4-a66c-9d94e1e9e780
Caton, Neil
5590dea6-f7ec-4b5d-b687-d24cd4977001
Cherry, Mary Gemma
08518eeb-0e79-4b7f-97fa-a4ca8bb53e61
Edwards, Bethan Mair
5554746c-357d-497c-8f3a-3f92136597b4
Downs, James
a6860438-c2a6-4c3c-b590-718ba29f2c42
Bush, Laura
288321b3-8dbd-4560-ab04-bf64d230f398
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Young, Bridget
f950d6c8-951a-461a-bf69-5ed67bba2a73
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Brooks, Helen
0056a0c8-f97a-4215-99e1-652291fcd6eb
Devereux-Fitzgerald, Angela
9de26d0b-03aa-4543-9c51-63103a3cf0c2
Richmond, Laura
8a3e5162-cf1e-4740-95c4-ea50dcac9fa3
Bee, Penny
76e373ee-12be-4966-8bb6-8157e1dc037d
Lovell, Karina
5d35b37c-4545-4ba4-a66c-9d94e1e9e780
Caton, Neil
5590dea6-f7ec-4b5d-b687-d24cd4977001
Cherry, Mary Gemma
08518eeb-0e79-4b7f-97fa-a4ca8bb53e61
Edwards, Bethan Mair
5554746c-357d-497c-8f3a-3f92136597b4
Downs, James
a6860438-c2a6-4c3c-b590-718ba29f2c42
Bush, Laura
288321b3-8dbd-4560-ab04-bf64d230f398
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Young, Bridget
f950d6c8-951a-461a-bf69-5ed67bba2a73
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Brooks, Helen, Devereux-Fitzgerald, Angela, Richmond, Laura, Bee, Penny, Lovell, Karina, Caton, Neil, Cherry, Mary Gemma, Edwards, Bethan Mair, Downs, James, Bush, Laura, Vassilev, Ivaylo, Young, Bridget and Rogers, Anne (2022) Assessing the effectiveness of social network interventions for adults with a diagnosis of mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of impact. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 57 (5), 907-925. (doi:10.1007/s00127-022-02242-w).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Social connections have been linked to the genesis and amelioration of mental health problems and thus have potential therapeutic value.

PURPOSE: To identify the current evidence base, assess risk of bias and synthesise findings on the effectiveness of social network interventions for people with mental health problems.

METHODS: Electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus) and grey literature databases were systematically searched from inception to October 2021 using free text syntax combining synonyms for 'mental health problems' and 'social network interventions'. Articles were eligible for inclusion if they reported data from randomised controlled trials on the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve social networks for adults (18+) with mental health problems. Papers were independently reviewed for inclusion with conflicts resolved through consensus. Included papers were quality assessed and data extracted and synthesized narratively. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool.

RESULTS: Nine studies randomising 2226 participants were included. Four focused on those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or psychosis, one on major depressive disorder and four included all types of mental health diagnoses. The current evidence base is of unclear quality. However, interventions which focused on supporting social activities appear to hold the most promise for enhancing social networks. Data on cost-effectiveness and research acceptability were limited, but suggest the potential economic feasibility of and acceptability for evaluating these interventions.

CONCLUSION: There is emerging evidence that social network interventions can be effective in improving social connections for people with mental health problems. However, further evaluations with robust methodological approaches are required to inform evidence-based recommendations for health services.

Text
Brooks2022_Article_AssessingTheEffectivenessOfSoc - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 January 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 February 2022
Published date: 1 May 2022
Additional Information: Funding This project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) Programme (Grant Reference Number PB-PG-0418-20011). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.
Keywords: Mental health, Narrative synthesis, Social networks, Systematic review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 456114
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/456114
ISSN: 0933-7954
PURE UUID: 967d08fd-bd66-4cf7-9e2c-e98d4409e87c
ORCID for Ivaylo Vassilev: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2206-8247

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Apr 2022 14:52
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 02:07

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Helen Brooks
Author: Angela Devereux-Fitzgerald
Author: Laura Richmond
Author: Penny Bee
Author: Karina Lovell
Author: Neil Caton
Author: Mary Gemma Cherry
Author: Bethan Mair Edwards
Author: James Downs
Author: Laura Bush
Author: Ivaylo Vassilev ORCID iD
Author: Bridget Young
Author: Anne Rogers

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×