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Patient perceptions of vulnerability to recurrent respiratory tract infections and prevention strategies; a qualitative study

Patient perceptions of vulnerability to recurrent respiratory tract infections and prevention strategies; a qualitative study
Patient perceptions of vulnerability to recurrent respiratory tract infections and prevention strategies; a qualitative study
Objectives: Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs) are extremely common, usually self-limiting, but responsible for considerable work sickness absence, reduced quality of life, inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and healthcare costs. Patients who experience recurrent RTIs and those with certain comorbid conditions have higher personal impact and healthcare costs and may be more likely to suffer disease exacerbations, hospitalisation and death. We explored how these patients experience and perceive their RTIs to understand how best to engage them in prevention behaviours.
Design: A qualitative interview study
Setting: Primary Care, UK
Methods: 23 participants who reported recurrent RTIs and/or had relevant comorbid health conditions were interviewed about their experiences of RTIs. Interviews took place as the COVID-19 pandemic began. Data was analysed using inductive thematic analysis.
Results: Three themes were developed: Understanding Causes and Vulnerability, Attempting to Prevent RTIs, Uncertainty and Ambivalence about Prevention, along with an overarching theme; Changing Experiences because of COVID-19. Participants’ understandings of their susceptibility to RTIs were multifactorial and included both transmission via others and personal vulnerabilities. They engaged in various approaches to try to prevent infections or alter their progression yet perceived they had limited personal control. The COVID-19 pandemic had improved their understanding of transmission, heightened their concern and motivation to avoid RTIs, and extended their repertoire of protective behaviours.
Conclusions: Patients who experience frequent or severe RTIs are likely to welcome and benefit from advice and support regarding RTI prevention. To engage people effectively, those developing interventions or delivering health services must consider their beliefs and concerns about susceptibility and prevention.
2044-6055
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Williamson, Sian
b6977ce7-16bf-4dde-92f4-18abe85ad093
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Handcock, Molly
d3207cdd-b28e-4719-a763-0bf49c7f6a0b
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Vennik, Jane
6ee78166-5a7a-433b-87fc-018771f20b19
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Geraghty, Adam
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Williamson, Sian
b6977ce7-16bf-4dde-92f4-18abe85ad093
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Handcock, Molly
d3207cdd-b28e-4719-a763-0bf49c7f6a0b
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Vennik, Jane
6ee78166-5a7a-433b-87fc-018771f20b19
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Geraghty, Adam
2c6549fe-9868-4806-b65a-21881c1930af

Dennison, Laura, Williamson, Sian, Greenwell, Kate, Handcock, Molly, Bradbury, Katherine, Vennik, Jane, Yardley, Lucy, Little, Paul and Geraghty, Adam (2022) Patient perceptions of vulnerability to recurrent respiratory tract infections and prevention strategies; a qualitative study. BMJ Open. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2021-055565). (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs) are extremely common, usually self-limiting, but responsible for considerable work sickness absence, reduced quality of life, inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and healthcare costs. Patients who experience recurrent RTIs and those with certain comorbid conditions have higher personal impact and healthcare costs and may be more likely to suffer disease exacerbations, hospitalisation and death. We explored how these patients experience and perceive their RTIs to understand how best to engage them in prevention behaviours.
Design: A qualitative interview study
Setting: Primary Care, UK
Methods: 23 participants who reported recurrent RTIs and/or had relevant comorbid health conditions were interviewed about their experiences of RTIs. Interviews took place as the COVID-19 pandemic began. Data was analysed using inductive thematic analysis.
Results: Three themes were developed: Understanding Causes and Vulnerability, Attempting to Prevent RTIs, Uncertainty and Ambivalence about Prevention, along with an overarching theme; Changing Experiences because of COVID-19. Participants’ understandings of their susceptibility to RTIs were multifactorial and included both transmission via others and personal vulnerabilities. They engaged in various approaches to try to prevent infections or alter their progression yet perceived they had limited personal control. The COVID-19 pandemic had improved their understanding of transmission, heightened their concern and motivation to avoid RTIs, and extended their repertoire of protective behaviours.
Conclusions: Patients who experience frequent or severe RTIs are likely to welcome and benefit from advice and support regarding RTI prevention. To engage people effectively, those developing interventions or delivering health services must consider their beliefs and concerns about susceptibility and prevention.

Text
DENNISON BMJ OPEN - Patient Perceptions of Vulnerability - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 20 March 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 456396
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/456396
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 8d8c2222-8a8a-432e-a8a7-3ef5da6f7452
ORCID for Laura Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0122-6610
ORCID for Sian Williamson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5448-3499
ORCID for Kate Greenwell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3662-1488
ORCID for Katherine Bradbury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5513-7571
ORCID for Jane Vennik: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4602-9805
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X
ORCID for Adam Geraghty: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7984-8351

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2022 15:45
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:27

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Contributors

Author: Laura Dennison ORCID iD
Author: Sian Williamson ORCID iD
Author: Kate Greenwell ORCID iD
Author: Molly Handcock
Author: Jane Vennik ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Yardley ORCID iD
Author: Paul Little
Author: Adam Geraghty ORCID iD

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