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Lipid bilayer platforms for parallel ion channel recordings

Lipid bilayer platforms for parallel ion channel recordings
Lipid bilayer platforms for parallel ion channel recordings
The ion flow through channel proteins embedded in a lipid bilayer membrane can be recorded as an electrical current, enabling biophysical characterization and pharmacological drug screening at a single-channel level. These measurements are challenging because the self-assembled bilayers are fragile and the currents are in the pA–nA range. This concise review introduces the bilayer recording methodology, with an emphasis on the requirements for full electrophysiology assays. The self-assembled lipid bilayer, formed in a ∼100 μm diameter aperture in between two aqueous chambers, is critical. Various approaches to increase the measurement throughput by scaling to aperture arrays are discussed in terms of current-amplifier technology, bilayer stability, ion channel incorporation, system functionality and obtained single-channel data. The various bilayer recording platforms all have advantages and limitations. Combining the strengths of the different platform architectures, for example, the use of shaped apertures, will be essential to realize and also automate parallel ion channel recordings.
bilayer array, ion channel, lipid bilayer, microsystem, nanopore
0021-4922
De Planque, Maurits
a1d33d13-f516-44fb-8d2c-c51d18bc21ba
De Planque, Maurits
a1d33d13-f516-44fb-8d2c-c51d18bc21ba

De Planque, Maurits (2022) Lipid bilayer platforms for parallel ion channel recordings. Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, 61 (SC), [SC0804]. (doi:10.35848/1347-4065/ac4f7a).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The ion flow through channel proteins embedded in a lipid bilayer membrane can be recorded as an electrical current, enabling biophysical characterization and pharmacological drug screening at a single-channel level. These measurements are challenging because the self-assembled bilayers are fragile and the currents are in the pA–nA range. This concise review introduces the bilayer recording methodology, with an emphasis on the requirements for full electrophysiology assays. The self-assembled lipid bilayer, formed in a ∼100 μm diameter aperture in between two aqueous chambers, is critical. Various approaches to increase the measurement throughput by scaling to aperture arrays are discussed in terms of current-amplifier technology, bilayer stability, ion channel incorporation, system functionality and obtained single-channel data. The various bilayer recording platforms all have advantages and limitations. Combining the strengths of the different platform architectures, for example, the use of shaped apertures, will be essential to realize and also automate parallel ion channel recordings.

Text
de_Planque_2022_Jpn._J._Appl._Phys._61_SC0804
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 January 2022
Published date: 30 March 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Author(s). Published on behalf of The Japan Society of Applied Physics by IOP Publishing Ltd.
Keywords: bilayer array, ion channel, lipid bilayer, microsystem, nanopore

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 456472
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/456472
ISSN: 0021-4922
PURE UUID: ef5d25bc-9901-49bf-a364-1c4fdf26bfc3
ORCID for Maurits De Planque: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8787-0513

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 May 2022 16:46
Last modified: 02 Jul 2022 01:44

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Contributors

Author: Maurits De Planque ORCID iD

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