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Using event related potentials to characterise inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes:: A dimensional approach to OCD

Using event related potentials to characterise inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes:: A dimensional approach to OCD
Using event related potentials to characterise inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes:: A dimensional approach to OCD
Objective: ‘Subsyndromal’ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms (OCDS) are common and cause impaired psychosocial functioning. OCDS are better captured by dimensional models of psychopathology, as opposed to categorical diagnoses. However, such dimensional approaches require a deep understanding of the underlying neurocognitive drivers and impulsive and compulsive traits (i.e., neurocognitive phenotypes) across symptoms. This study investigated inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsivity, compulsivity and their interaction in individuals (n = 40) experiencing mild-moderate OCDS. Methods: EEG recording concurrent with the stop signal task was used to elicit event related potentials (ERPs) indexing inhibitory control (i.e., N2 and P3) and self-monitoring (i.e., ERN and CRN: negativity following erroneous or correct responses, respectively). Results: During unsuccessful stopping, individuals high in both impulsivity and compulsivity displayed enhanced N2 amplitude, indicative of conflict between the urge to respond and need to stop (F (3, 33) = 1.48, p < .05, 95% Cl [-.01, .001]). Individuals high in compulsivity and low in impulsivity showed reduced P3 amplitude, consistent with impairments in monitoring failed inhibitory control (F (3, 24) = 2.033, p < .05, 95% CI [-.002, .045]). Following successful stopping, high compulsivity (independent of impulsivity) was associated with lower CRN amplitude, reflecting hypo-monitoring of correct responses (F (4, 32) = 4.76, p < .05, 95% CI [.01, .02]), and with greater OCDS severity (F (3, 36) = 3.32, p < .05, 95% CI [.03, .19]). Conclusion: The current findings provide evidence for differential, ERP indexed inhibitory control and self-monitoring profiles across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes in OCDS.
1092-8529
Dhir, Sakshi
c4345e15-babe-4a88-b89f-761a1216a4c4
Tyler, Kaelasha
d190122e-8890-4c5b-9d77-4919fac57c06
Albertella, Lucy
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Chamberlain, Samuel
8a0e09e6-f51f-4039-9287-88debe8d8b6f
Teo, Wei Peng
c1a99f56-f862-43f2-9656-a41033715b15
Yücel, Murat
aff092ea-35e0-476a-b9bf-ace9b84aa1e1
Segrave, Rebecca A.
0ee96b6e-fd3f-47c7-990d-806312390b83
Dhir, Sakshi
c4345e15-babe-4a88-b89f-761a1216a4c4
Tyler, Kaelasha
d190122e-8890-4c5b-9d77-4919fac57c06
Albertella, Lucy
c95a7a69-10d8-4549-a155-55a42170d8c0
Chamberlain, Samuel
8a0e09e6-f51f-4039-9287-88debe8d8b6f
Teo, Wei Peng
c1a99f56-f862-43f2-9656-a41033715b15
Yücel, Murat
aff092ea-35e0-476a-b9bf-ace9b84aa1e1
Segrave, Rebecca A.
0ee96b6e-fd3f-47c7-990d-806312390b83

Dhir, Sakshi, Tyler, Kaelasha, Albertella, Lucy, Chamberlain, Samuel, Teo, Wei Peng, Yücel, Murat and Segrave, Rebecca A. (2022) Using event related potentials to characterise inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes:: A dimensional approach to OCD. CNS Spectrums.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: ‘Subsyndromal’ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder symptoms (OCDS) are common and cause impaired psychosocial functioning. OCDS are better captured by dimensional models of psychopathology, as opposed to categorical diagnoses. However, such dimensional approaches require a deep understanding of the underlying neurocognitive drivers and impulsive and compulsive traits (i.e., neurocognitive phenotypes) across symptoms. This study investigated inhibitory control and self-monitoring across impulsivity, compulsivity and their interaction in individuals (n = 40) experiencing mild-moderate OCDS. Methods: EEG recording concurrent with the stop signal task was used to elicit event related potentials (ERPs) indexing inhibitory control (i.e., N2 and P3) and self-monitoring (i.e., ERN and CRN: negativity following erroneous or correct responses, respectively). Results: During unsuccessful stopping, individuals high in both impulsivity and compulsivity displayed enhanced N2 amplitude, indicative of conflict between the urge to respond and need to stop (F (3, 33) = 1.48, p < .05, 95% Cl [-.01, .001]). Individuals high in compulsivity and low in impulsivity showed reduced P3 amplitude, consistent with impairments in monitoring failed inhibitory control (F (3, 24) = 2.033, p < .05, 95% CI [-.002, .045]). Following successful stopping, high compulsivity (independent of impulsivity) was associated with lower CRN amplitude, reflecting hypo-monitoring of correct responses (F (4, 32) = 4.76, p < .05, 95% CI [.01, .02]), and with greater OCDS severity (F (3, 36) = 3.32, p < .05, 95% CI [.03, .19]). Conclusion: The current findings provide evidence for differential, ERP indexed inhibitory control and self-monitoring profiles across impulsive and compulsive phenotypes in OCDS.

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Accepted/In Press date: 28 March 2022
Published date: 29 April 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 456698
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/456698
ISSN: 1092-8529
PURE UUID: dde633d7-dfa9-4b45-bf84-69bb5754d829
ORCID for Samuel Chamberlain: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7014-8121

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 May 2022 17:16
Last modified: 01 Dec 2022 05:01

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Contributors

Author: Sakshi Dhir
Author: Kaelasha Tyler
Author: Lucy Albertella
Author: Samuel Chamberlain ORCID iD
Author: Wei Peng Teo
Author: Murat Yücel
Author: Rebecca A. Segrave

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