The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Static analysis of a passive vibration isolator with quasi-zero-stiffness characteristic

Static analysis of a passive vibration isolator with quasi-zero-stiffness characteristic
Static analysis of a passive vibration isolator with quasi-zero-stiffness characteristic
The frequency range over which a linear passive vibration isolator is effective, is often limited by the mount stiffness required to support a static load. This can be improved upon by employing nonlinear mounts incorporating negative stiffness elements configured in such a way that the dynamic stiffness is much less than the static stiffness. Such nonlinear mounts are used widely in practice, but rigorous analysis, and hence a clear understanding of their behaviour is not readily available in the literature. In this paper, a simple system comprising a vertical spring acting in parallel with two oblique springs is studied. It is shown that there is a unique relationship between the geometry and the stiffness of the springs that yields a system with zero dynamic stiffness at the static equilibrium position. The dynamic stiffness increases monotonically with displacement either side of the equilibrium position, and this is least severe when the oblique springs are inclined at an angle between approximately 48° and 57°. Finally, it is shown that the force–displacement characteristic of the system can be approximated by a cubic equation
0022-460X
678-689
Carrella, A.
1a1904a5-80c2-435a-b3d4-2e26d87ece61
Brennan, M.J.
87c7bca3-a9e5-46aa-9153-34c712355a13
Waters, T.P.
348d22f5-dba1-4384-87ac-04fe5d603c2f
Carrella, A.
1a1904a5-80c2-435a-b3d4-2e26d87ece61
Brennan, M.J.
87c7bca3-a9e5-46aa-9153-34c712355a13
Waters, T.P.
348d22f5-dba1-4384-87ac-04fe5d603c2f

Carrella, A., Brennan, M.J. and Waters, T.P. (2007) Static analysis of a passive vibration isolator with quasi-zero-stiffness characteristic. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 301 (3-5), 678-689. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2006.10.011).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The frequency range over which a linear passive vibration isolator is effective, is often limited by the mount stiffness required to support a static load. This can be improved upon by employing nonlinear mounts incorporating negative stiffness elements configured in such a way that the dynamic stiffness is much less than the static stiffness. Such nonlinear mounts are used widely in practice, but rigorous analysis, and hence a clear understanding of their behaviour is not readily available in the literature. In this paper, a simple system comprising a vertical spring acting in parallel with two oblique springs is studied. It is shown that there is a unique relationship between the geometry and the stiffness of the springs that yields a system with zero dynamic stiffness at the static equilibrium position. The dynamic stiffness increases monotonically with displacement either side of the equilibrium position, and this is least severe when the oblique springs are inclined at an angle between approximately 48° and 57°. Finally, it is shown that the force–displacement characteristic of the system can be approximated by a cubic equation

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 45691
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/45691
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 91d94f26-5925-491a-8073-22115c578e72

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Apr 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:05

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: A. Carrella
Author: M.J. Brennan
Author: T.P. Waters

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×