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Subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees: a systematic literature review

Subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees: a systematic literature review
Subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees: a systematic literature review
We present a systematic review of 67 empirical studies that examine the factors determining subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we propose an integrated conceptual framework that organizes antecedents of blue-collar immigrants' subjective well-being based on resource loss and gain dynamics. Our findings indicate that resource loss was most likely when immigrants experienced precarious employment, physically and emotionally demanding jobs, injustice at work, poor living conditions, and migration-related stressors. Conversely, resource gain was most likely when they were supported by supervisors and colleagues at work, felt emotionally supported by friends, family, and community members, and adopted personal coping strategies to manage their stressors. We conclude by signaling opportunities for future research and recommendations for practitioners seeking to augment blue-collar immigrant employees' subjective well-being.
Employment, Job satisfaction, Labor migration, Mental health, Psychological well-being
1053-4822
Shirmohammadi, Melika
08b4c9e0-4f76-486f-b4c5-f25528476711
Beigi, Mina
2986037e-5bb3-4ec0-be55-bf291ac17e24
Richardson, Julia
74238879-1eb3-4d23-aaa4-cd9d5b8de356
Shirmohammadi, Melika
08b4c9e0-4f76-486f-b4c5-f25528476711
Beigi, Mina
2986037e-5bb3-4ec0-be55-bf291ac17e24
Richardson, Julia
74238879-1eb3-4d23-aaa4-cd9d5b8de356

Shirmohammadi, Melika, Beigi, Mina and Richardson, Julia (2023) Subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees: a systematic literature review. Human Resource Management Review, 33 (1), [100914]. (doi:10.1016/j.hrmr.2022.100914).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We present a systematic review of 67 empirical studies that examine the factors determining subjective well-being among blue-collar immigrant employees. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we propose an integrated conceptual framework that organizes antecedents of blue-collar immigrants' subjective well-being based on resource loss and gain dynamics. Our findings indicate that resource loss was most likely when immigrants experienced precarious employment, physically and emotionally demanding jobs, injustice at work, poor living conditions, and migration-related stressors. Conversely, resource gain was most likely when they were supported by supervisors and colleagues at work, felt emotionally supported by friends, family, and community members, and adopted personal coping strategies to manage their stressors. We conclude by signaling opportunities for future research and recommendations for practitioners seeking to augment blue-collar immigrant employees' subjective well-being.

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Accepted Version- Subjective Well-Being among Blue-Collar Immigrant Employees - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 30 April 2024.
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 April 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 April 2022
Published date: March 2023
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022 Elsevier Inc.
Keywords: Employment, Job satisfaction, Labor migration, Mental health, Psychological well-being

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457068
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457068
ISSN: 1053-4822
PURE UUID: 6ccc0a6e-ed9e-40b1-9136-a51748375811
ORCID for Mina Beigi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4866-7205

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 May 2022 16:46
Last modified: 07 Feb 2023 03:03

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Contributors

Author: Melika Shirmohammadi
Author: Mina Beigi ORCID iD
Author: Julia Richardson

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