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Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: a follow-up survey

Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: a follow-up survey
Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: a follow-up survey
Background Treatment burden is the workload of being a patient and its impact on wellbeing. Little is known about change in treatment burden over time for people with multimorbidity. Aim To quantify change in treatment burden, determine factors associated with this change, and evaluate a revised single-item measure for high treatment burden in older adults with multimorbidity. Design and setting A 2.5-year follow-up of a cross-sectional postal survey via six general practices in Dorset, England. Method GP practices identified participants of the baseline survey. Data on treatment burden (measured using the Multimorbidity Treatment Burden Questionnaire; MTBQ), sociodemographics, clinical variables, health literacy and financial resource were collected. Change in treatment burden was described, and associations assessed using regression models. Diagnostic test performance metrics evaluated the single-item measure relative to the MTBQ. Results 301 participants were recruited (77.6% response rate). Overall, there was a 2.6% increase in treatment burden. 98 (32.6%) and 53 (17.6%) participants experienced an increase and decrease, respectively, in treatment burden category. An increase in treatment burden was associated with having more than five long-term conditions (ß:8.26 (95% CI: 4.20 to 12.32) and living >10 minutes (vs. ≤10 minutes) from the GP (aß:3.88 (95% CI: 1.32 to 6.43)), particularly for participants with limited health literacy (mean difference: aß:9.59 (95% CI: 2.17 to 17.00)). The single-item measure performed moderately- sensitivity: 56.5%; specificity: 92.5%. Conclusion Treatment burden changes over time. Improving access to primary care, particularly for those living further away from services, and enhancing health literacy, may mitigate increases in burden.
0960-1643
Hounkpatin, Hilda
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Roderick, Paul
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Harris, Scott
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Morris, James, Edward
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Smith, Dianna
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Walsh, Bronagh
5818243e-048d-4b4b-88c5-231b0e419427
Roberts, Helen
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Dambha-Miller, Hajira
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Tan, Qian Yue
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Watson, Forbes
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Fraser, Simon
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Hounkpatin, Hilda
5612e5b4-6286-48c8-b81f-e96d1148681d
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Harris, Scott
19ea097b-df15-4f0f-be19-8ac42c190028
Morris, James, Edward
631cdf2c-3ddf-41ef-8b74-65a1dffb1e58
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Walsh, Bronagh
5818243e-048d-4b4b-88c5-231b0e419427
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Dambha-Miller, Hajira
58961db5-31aa-460e-9394-08590c4b7ba1
Tan, Qian Yue
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Watson, Forbes
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Fraser, Simon
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Hounkpatin, Hilda, Roderick, Paul, Harris, Scott, Morris, James, Edward, Smith, Dianna, Walsh, Bronagh, Roberts, Helen, Dambha-Miller, Hajira, Tan, Qian Yue, Watson, Forbes and Fraser, Simon (2022) Change in treatment burden among people with multimorbidity: a follow-up survey. British Journal of General Practice.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Treatment burden is the workload of being a patient and its impact on wellbeing. Little is known about change in treatment burden over time for people with multimorbidity. Aim To quantify change in treatment burden, determine factors associated with this change, and evaluate a revised single-item measure for high treatment burden in older adults with multimorbidity. Design and setting A 2.5-year follow-up of a cross-sectional postal survey via six general practices in Dorset, England. Method GP practices identified participants of the baseline survey. Data on treatment burden (measured using the Multimorbidity Treatment Burden Questionnaire; MTBQ), sociodemographics, clinical variables, health literacy and financial resource were collected. Change in treatment burden was described, and associations assessed using regression models. Diagnostic test performance metrics evaluated the single-item measure relative to the MTBQ. Results 301 participants were recruited (77.6% response rate). Overall, there was a 2.6% increase in treatment burden. 98 (32.6%) and 53 (17.6%) participants experienced an increase and decrease, respectively, in treatment burden category. An increase in treatment burden was associated with having more than five long-term conditions (ß:8.26 (95% CI: 4.20 to 12.32) and living >10 minutes (vs. ≤10 minutes) from the GP (aß:3.88 (95% CI: 1.32 to 6.43)), particularly for participants with limited health literacy (mean difference: aß:9.59 (95% CI: 2.17 to 17.00)). The single-item measure performed moderately- sensitivity: 56.5%; specificity: 92.5%. Conclusion Treatment burden changes over time. Improving access to primary care, particularly for those living further away from services, and enhancing health literacy, may mitigate increases in burden.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 April 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 May 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457151
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457151
ISSN: 0960-1643
PURE UUID: b466acd3-d231-4462-816f-d7610686eefa
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for Dianna Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0650-6606
ORCID for Bronagh Walsh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1008-0545
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880
ORCID for Hajira Dambha-Miller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0175-443X
ORCID for Simon Fraser: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4172-4406

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Date deposited: 24 May 2022 17:07
Last modified: 25 May 2022 01:54

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Contributors

Author: Paul Roderick ORCID iD
Author: Scott Harris
Author: James, Edward Morris
Author: Dianna Smith ORCID iD
Author: Bronagh Walsh ORCID iD
Author: Helen Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Qian Yue Tan
Author: Forbes Watson
Author: Simon Fraser ORCID iD

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