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Rights and development: the costs of human rights in Ethiopia

Rights and development: the costs of human rights in Ethiopia
Rights and development: the costs of human rights in Ethiopia
It is sometimes argued that more attention needs to be paid to the cost of realizing human rights in human rights scholarship and practice. In Ethiopia, a focus on the cost of realizing human rights has played a crucial role in justifying the government’s aggressive development plans. While the aim of this development is to reduce poverty and secure greater rights and well-being for the future, rapid growth has come at a considerable human rights cost. This raises questions about what the relevant costs of rights are and how those costs ought to be understood or justified. A straightforward costs-approach to human rights, however, may not adequately take into account the cost of generating the means to pay for rights. We find that examining rights from a costs perspective in a case like Ethiopia requires investigations not only into what rights cost the government, but also into how that wealth is generated.
270-299
Edward Elgar
Townsend, Dina
526ee2bc-7f3d-4a01-9d21-358a8999e364
Broeckhoven, Nicky
67fe22b5-1eaf-44c7-ada8-7c3dd0e5d596
Wouters, Jan
Lemmens, Koen
Poecke, Thomas Van
Bourguignon, Marie
Townsend, Dina
526ee2bc-7f3d-4a01-9d21-358a8999e364
Broeckhoven, Nicky
67fe22b5-1eaf-44c7-ada8-7c3dd0e5d596
Wouters, Jan
Lemmens, Koen
Poecke, Thomas Van
Bourguignon, Marie

Townsend, Dina and Broeckhoven, Nicky (2020) Rights and development: the costs of human rights in Ethiopia. In, Wouters, Jan, Lemmens, Koen, Poecke, Thomas Van and Bourguignon, Marie (eds.) Can We Still Afford Human Rights? Edward Elgar, pp. 270-299. (doi:10.4337/9781839100321.00020).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

It is sometimes argued that more attention needs to be paid to the cost of realizing human rights in human rights scholarship and practice. In Ethiopia, a focus on the cost of realizing human rights has played a crucial role in justifying the government’s aggressive development plans. While the aim of this development is to reduce poverty and secure greater rights and well-being for the future, rapid growth has come at a considerable human rights cost. This raises questions about what the relevant costs of rights are and how those costs ought to be understood or justified. A straightforward costs-approach to human rights, however, may not adequately take into account the cost of generating the means to pay for rights. We find that examining rights from a costs perspective in a case like Ethiopia requires investigations not only into what rights cost the government, but also into how that wealth is generated.

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Published date: 13 October 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457503
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457503
PURE UUID: fe6ade39-f321-4826-92d1-ebebe892c3fc
ORCID for Dina Townsend: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6531-8066

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Date deposited: 09 Jun 2022 17:09
Last modified: 11 Aug 2022 02:06

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Contributors

Author: Dina Townsend ORCID iD
Author: Nicky Broeckhoven
Editor: Jan Wouters
Editor: Koen Lemmens
Editor: Thomas Van Poecke
Editor: Marie Bourguignon

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