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The demographic challenge

The demographic challenge
The demographic challenge
• Changes in the size and composition of the population are the result of the combined effects of changes in mortality, fertility and migration. However, the most important driver behind population ageing is the decline in fertility rates.
• The key demographic changes in the UK over the last century include a declining fertility rate, a fluctuating but generally low mortality rate and the shift of the UK from a being country of emigration to country of predominantly inward immigration. Since the 1990s migration has been the main driver of the UK’ growth in population size.
• The UK today can be described as an aged society, where the proportion of older people (aged 65 and over) increasingly represents a greater part of the total population. It is projected that there will be an additional 7.5 million people aged 65 years and over in the UK in 50 years' time.
• Changes in mortality, fertility and migration in the UK have been taking place alongside an increasing diversity in the ethnic composition of the population, and changes in family structures and living arrangements.
• Understanding demographic changes is a key part of designing and implementing social policies for a constantly changing population.
Wiley
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Alcock, Pete
Haux, Tina
McCall, Vikki
May, Margaret
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
Alcock, Pete
Haux, Tina
McCall, Vikki
May, Margaret

Falkingham, Jane and Vlachantoni, Athina (2022) The demographic challenge. In, Alcock, Pete, Haux, Tina, McCall, Vikki and May, Margaret (eds.) The Student's Companion to Social Policy. Wiley.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

• Changes in the size and composition of the population are the result of the combined effects of changes in mortality, fertility and migration. However, the most important driver behind population ageing is the decline in fertility rates.
• The key demographic changes in the UK over the last century include a declining fertility rate, a fluctuating but generally low mortality rate and the shift of the UK from a being country of emigration to country of predominantly inward immigration. Since the 1990s migration has been the main driver of the UK’ growth in population size.
• The UK today can be described as an aged society, where the proportion of older people (aged 65 and over) increasingly represents a greater part of the total population. It is projected that there will be an additional 7.5 million people aged 65 years and over in the UK in 50 years' time.
• Changes in mortality, fertility and migration in the UK have been taking place alongside an increasing diversity in the ethnic composition of the population, and changes in family structures and living arrangements.
• Understanding demographic changes is a key part of designing and implementing social policies for a constantly changing population.

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Published date: 1 May 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 457867
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/457867
PURE UUID: d51ed865-3344-4cfb-97c5-ccc8c8b623dc
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for Athina Vlachantoni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1539-3057

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jun 2022 18:04
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:58

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Contributors

Author: Jane Falkingham ORCID iD
Editor: Pete Alcock
Editor: Tina Haux
Editor: Vikki McCall
Editor: Margaret May

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