The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Wellington, Ireland and the Catholic question, 1807-1827

Wellington, Ireland and the Catholic question, 1807-1827
Wellington, Ireland and the Catholic question, 1807-1827

The Duke of Wellington was an Anglo-Irishman who, throughout his career, was aware of the problems posed for the British state by the Irish Catholics in their campaign for full political rights. This was the case even when his career removed him from immediate contact with Ireland and her problems. This thesis traces the evolution of his attitude to the Catholic question from his period of office as Chief Secretary for Ireland to the end of the Liverpool administration, when he resigned from the cabinet for reasons at least in part connected with this issue. The context within which Wellington's views developed, in British domestic politics, in Anglo-Irish and in International affairs is discussed, as far as is relevant. Particular attention is paid to the issue of `securities' which was central to the debates on Catholic relief throughout this period. The main conclusion is that Wellington, although a member of the Anglo-Irish ascendancy, and closely connected with those opposed to Catholic relief, was never rigid or purely repressive in his attitude to the Catholics and Catholicism. In particular he hoped through an understanding with the Papacy to reach a once for all solution to a question in which religion, nationalism, the sovereign state and many other factors interacted with great complexity.

University of Southampton
Piggott, Karen Ann
Piggott, Karen Ann

Piggott, Karen Ann (1990) Wellington, Ireland and the Catholic question, 1807-1827. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The Duke of Wellington was an Anglo-Irishman who, throughout his career, was aware of the problems posed for the British state by the Irish Catholics in their campaign for full political rights. This was the case even when his career removed him from immediate contact with Ireland and her problems. This thesis traces the evolution of his attitude to the Catholic question from his period of office as Chief Secretary for Ireland to the end of the Liverpool administration, when he resigned from the cabinet for reasons at least in part connected with this issue. The context within which Wellington's views developed, in British domestic politics, in Anglo-Irish and in International affairs is discussed, as far as is relevant. Particular attention is paid to the issue of `securities' which was central to the debates on Catholic relief throughout this period. The main conclusion is that Wellington, although a member of the Anglo-Irish ascendancy, and closely connected with those opposed to Catholic relief, was never rigid or purely repressive in his attitude to the Catholics and Catholicism. In particular he hoped through an understanding with the Papacy to reach a once for all solution to a question in which religion, nationalism, the sovereign state and many other factors interacted with great complexity.

Text
25869.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (12MB)

More information

Published date: 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 458263
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/458263
PURE UUID: 995c8ef2-d629-4abf-b1c3-2ac81cb1be21

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2022 16:45
Last modified: 04 Jul 2022 17:21

Export record

Contributors

Author: Karen Ann Piggott

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×