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Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by turbulent boundary-layers

Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by turbulent boundary-layers
Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by turbulent boundary-layers
Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of turbulent flow passing an infinitely thin trailing edge (TE). The objective is to investigate the turbulent flow field in the vicinity of the TE and the associated broadband noise generation. To generate a turbulent boundary layer a short distance from the inflow boundary, a technique is employed which exploits the dynamical features of the outer and inner part of the boundary layer. The DNS data are Fourier transformed in time and point spectra at various locations are used to identify representative frequencies. Several flow quantities are visualized for these frequencies and compared to predictions made with an acoustic analogy and a modified version of Amiet's classical trailing edge noise theory. A rapid increase in skin friction and a decrease in boundary layer thickness is observed at the trailing edge, consistent with analytical predictions using triple deck theory, leading to suppression of very low frequencies as found from point spectra.
Sandberg, R.D.
41d03f60-5d12-4f2d-a40a-8ff89ef01cfa
Sandham, N.D.
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97
Sandberg, R.D.
41d03f60-5d12-4f2d-a40a-8ff89ef01cfa
Sandham, N.D.
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97

Sandberg, R.D. and Sandham, N.D. (1970) Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by turbulent boundary-layers. 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit. 08 - 11 Jan 2007. 15 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of turbulent flow passing an infinitely thin trailing edge (TE). The objective is to investigate the turbulent flow field in the vicinity of the TE and the associated broadband noise generation. To generate a turbulent boundary layer a short distance from the inflow boundary, a technique is employed which exploits the dynamical features of the outer and inner part of the boundary layer. The DNS data are Fourier transformed in time and point spectra at various locations are used to identify representative frequencies. Several flow quantities are visualized for these frequencies and compared to predictions made with an acoustic analogy and a modified version of Amiet's classical trailing edge noise theory. A rapid increase in skin friction and a decrease in boundary layer thickness is observed at the trailing edge, consistent with analytical predictions using triple deck theory, leading to suppression of very low frequencies as found from point spectra.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1970
Additional Information: AIAA 2007-1037
Venue - Dates: 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 2007-01-08 - 2007-01-11
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 46017
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/46017
PURE UUID: 12090309-2b55-40aa-be1f-b4c6b505b1d5
ORCID for R.D. Sandberg: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-3944
ORCID for N.D. Sandham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5107-0944

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2007
Last modified: 14 Jun 2019 00:35

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