The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The French approach to disarmament between 1920-1930 : policy making process, principles and methods

The French approach to disarmament between 1920-1930 : policy making process, principles and methods
The French approach to disarmament between 1920-1930 : policy making process, principles and methods

This thesis analyses France's disarmament approach between 1920 and 1930, arguing that this was designed by the military, aided by experts, to shield the country's defence capabilities from disarmament. This is illustrated by analysis of the French security concept, the disarmament making process, and the method and principles underlying disarmament policy. Security is approached from two angles: concept and means. The concept consisted of three dimensions: security against Germany; security of the empire; and the preservation of the status quo of the world order. The means set to achieve this security were alliance with America and Britain, collective security and France's own military capabilities. France failed to achieve the first two and her own army was overwhelmed by internal and external problems. The result was the country's vulnerability and the subordination of disarmament to security. The formal process by which this conditional disarmament was elaborated consisted of the French Service of the League of Nations and the Supreme Council of National Defence (Le Counseil Superieur de La Defense Nationale (CSDN)) which had two subsidiaries: the Permanent General Secretariat and a Study Commission. These institutions were largely staffed by the military and experts whose say in disarmament was dominant to the point of relegation of the executive's role to rubber stamping and the almost complete exclusion of parliament. Such a process produced a disarmament approach based on a constant set of principles and methods. The three principles were: no disarmament without security, interdependence of forces, and war potential. The methods related to three ways of carrying out disarmament: by limitation of effectiveness, military expenditure, or material. France adopted different views on each of these methods according to its defence organisation and security needs. The thesis concludes by confirming that the French disarmament approach between 1920 and 1930 was designed by the military and the experts who had a monopoly over the decision making process. The set of principles and methods composing this approach were calculated on the basis of the country's defence and security weakness in order to counteract disarmament.

University of Southampton
Chirouf, Lamri
Chirouf, Lamri

Chirouf, Lamri (1989) The French approach to disarmament between 1920-1930 : policy making process, principles and methods. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis analyses France's disarmament approach between 1920 and 1930, arguing that this was designed by the military, aided by experts, to shield the country's defence capabilities from disarmament. This is illustrated by analysis of the French security concept, the disarmament making process, and the method and principles underlying disarmament policy. Security is approached from two angles: concept and means. The concept consisted of three dimensions: security against Germany; security of the empire; and the preservation of the status quo of the world order. The means set to achieve this security were alliance with America and Britain, collective security and France's own military capabilities. France failed to achieve the first two and her own army was overwhelmed by internal and external problems. The result was the country's vulnerability and the subordination of disarmament to security. The formal process by which this conditional disarmament was elaborated consisted of the French Service of the League of Nations and the Supreme Council of National Defence (Le Counseil Superieur de La Defense Nationale (CSDN)) which had two subsidiaries: the Permanent General Secretariat and a Study Commission. These institutions were largely staffed by the military and experts whose say in disarmament was dominant to the point of relegation of the executive's role to rubber stamping and the almost complete exclusion of parliament. Such a process produced a disarmament approach based on a constant set of principles and methods. The three principles were: no disarmament without security, interdependence of forces, and war potential. The methods related to three ways of carrying out disarmament: by limitation of effectiveness, military expenditure, or material. France adopted different views on each of these methods according to its defence organisation and security needs. The thesis concludes by confirming that the French disarmament approach between 1920 and 1930 was designed by the military and the experts who had a monopoly over the decision making process. The set of principles and methods composing this approach were calculated on the basis of the country's defence and security weakness in order to counteract disarmament.

Text
348173.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (21MB)

More information

Published date: 1989

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 461199
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/461199
PURE UUID: 8b9210e8-9cc9-4814-a739-b8a3d149f5fb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2022 18:38
Last modified: 04 Jul 2022 19:51

Export record

Contributors

Author: Lamri Chirouf

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×