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Police use of coercion : reasonable force?

Police use of coercion : reasonable force?
Police use of coercion : reasonable force?

This is a socio-legal examination of many aspects of the police use of coercion, divided into four parts. Part one provides a historical overview for the rest of the work. Part two looks at coercion and the individual officer, examining legal and sociological circumstances relevant to police use of force, and an analysis of the police use of firearms. Part of coercion in a public order context. This legislation and trends. The policing tactics is charted and the question of parami1itarism in policing and the desirability of a specialised riot police force considered. Part four deals with the accountability and control mechanisms that should technically prevent the police behaving with unnecessary coercion, and reflects upon how they have failed. three confronts the issues arising from the police use includes a look at recent drift towards m o re militarised and coercive Legal changes are advocated throughout, but t h e re is an awareness of their limitations as constraints on police b e h a v i o u r. Important themes include; the ideology, whether police coercion is used offensively or defensively, for containment or repression, and the dangers of creating a circularity of violence and an upward coercive spiral if the police is urged, coercive capacity is continually being upgraded. Reform conflict between laws and t he police cultural both legal, and in policing practice, for it is argued that the police's wide discretion to use coercion has been neglected for too long.

University of Southampton
Payne, Richard John
c43d2a22-5f37-465d-b21e-123a2848e0a9
Payne, Richard John
c43d2a22-5f37-465d-b21e-123a2848e0a9

Payne, Richard John (1989) Police use of coercion : reasonable force? University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This is a socio-legal examination of many aspects of the police use of coercion, divided into four parts. Part one provides a historical overview for the rest of the work. Part two looks at coercion and the individual officer, examining legal and sociological circumstances relevant to police use of force, and an analysis of the police use of firearms. Part of coercion in a public order context. This legislation and trends. The policing tactics is charted and the question of parami1itarism in policing and the desirability of a specialised riot police force considered. Part four deals with the accountability and control mechanisms that should technically prevent the police behaving with unnecessary coercion, and reflects upon how they have failed. three confronts the issues arising from the police use includes a look at recent drift towards m o re militarised and coercive Legal changes are advocated throughout, but t h e re is an awareness of their limitations as constraints on police b e h a v i o u r. Important themes include; the ideology, whether police coercion is used offensively or defensively, for containment or repression, and the dangers of creating a circularity of violence and an upward coercive spiral if the police is urged, coercive capacity is continually being upgraded. Reform conflict between laws and t he police cultural both legal, and in policing practice, for it is argued that the police's wide discretion to use coercion has been neglected for too long.

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Published date: 1989

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 461819
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/461819
PURE UUID: eebab14e-2c79-4c2d-bb4a-f96856e5abb7

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2022 18:56
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 00:34

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Contributors

Author: Richard John Payne

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