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Early agriculture environment on the Hampshire chalklands : circa 800 B.C. - 400 A.D.

Early agriculture environment on the Hampshire chalklands : circa 800 B.C. - 400 A.D.
Early agriculture environment on the Hampshire chalklands : circa 800 B.C. - 400 A.D.

This thesis presents the results of a study of plant remains, principally fruits and seeds, from 10 sites of the Iron Age and Roman periods on the Hampshire Chalklands and from two further sites outside the area. The geographical and cultural background is outlined and the location of sites with respect to natural resources is considered. The critically reviewed, and an examination of the problem of contamination by modern plant material is made. The remains recovered are described in detail, and representative specimens are illustrated. methods of sampling and flotation are plant Wild plant communities represented by these fruits and seeds include woodlands, scrub, grasslands, wetlands, heath, and arable weed and ruderal vegetations. These communities and their exploitation are discussed and the natural and humanly-modified environment of early Roman Winchester is examined in greater detail. Evidence for pre-Roman arboriculture and horticulture, and the range of Roman fruit and vegetable crops are both discussed. Botanical arable farming in both periods is reviewed, and the pro- cesses involved in cereal production, both in the fields and after harvest are examined in detail. and archaeological evidence concerning

University of Southampton
Murphy, Peter Lawrence
Murphy, Peter Lawrence

Murphy, Peter Lawrence (1977) Early agriculture environment on the Hampshire chalklands : circa 800 B.C. - 400 A.D. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis presents the results of a study of plant remains, principally fruits and seeds, from 10 sites of the Iron Age and Roman periods on the Hampshire Chalklands and from two further sites outside the area. The geographical and cultural background is outlined and the location of sites with respect to natural resources is considered. The critically reviewed, and an examination of the problem of contamination by modern plant material is made. The remains recovered are described in detail, and representative specimens are illustrated. methods of sampling and flotation are plant Wild plant communities represented by these fruits and seeds include woodlands, scrub, grasslands, wetlands, heath, and arable weed and ruderal vegetations. These communities and their exploitation are discussed and the natural and humanly-modified environment of early Roman Winchester is examined in greater detail. Evidence for pre-Roman arboriculture and horticulture, and the range of Roman fruit and vegetable crops are both discussed. Botanical arable farming in both periods is reviewed, and the pro- cesses involved in cereal production, both in the fields and after harvest are examined in detail. and archaeological evidence concerning

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Published date: 1977

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 462490
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/462490
PURE UUID: edb59d5e-194e-4e2d-9bfc-ffa5406bdc2f

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2022 19:09
Last modified: 04 Jul 2022 20:42

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Contributors

Author: Peter Lawrence Murphy

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