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Ray tracing approach to calculate acoustic shielding by a flying wing airframe

Ray tracing approach to calculate acoustic shielding by a flying wing airframe
Ray tracing approach to calculate acoustic shielding by a flying wing airframe
The “silent aircraft” is in the form of a flying wing with a large wing planform and a propulsion system that is embedded in the rear of the airframe with intakes on the upper surface of the wing. Thus a large part of the forward propagating noise from the intake ducts is expected to be shielded from observers on the ground by the wing. Acoustic shielding effects can be calculated by solving an external acoustic scattering problem for a moving aircraft. In this paper, acoustic shielding effects of the silent aircraft airframe are quantified by a ray-tracing method. The dominant frequencies from the noise spectrum of the engines are sufficiently high for ray theory to yield accurate results. It is shown that, for low-Mach number homentropic flows, a condition satisfied approximately during takeoff and approach, the acoustic rays propagate in straight lines. Thus, from Fermat’s principle it is clear that classical geometrical optics and geometrical theory of diffraction solutions are applicable to this moving-body problem as well. The total amount of acoustic shielding at an observer located in the shadow region is calculated by adding the contributions from all the diffracted rays (edge-diffracted and creeping rays) and then subtracting the result from the incident field without the airframe. The three-dimensional ray-tracing solver is validated by comparing the numerical solutions with analytical high-frequency asymptotic solutions for canonical shapes. Experiments on a model-scale geometry have been conducted in an anechoic chamber to test the applicability of the ray-tracing technique. The results confirm the accuracy of the approach, which is then applied to a CAD representation of a prototype silent aircraft design. As expected, the flying wing configuration provides very significant ground shielding (in excess of 10 dB at all locations) of a source above the airframe.
0001-1452
1080-1090
Agarwal, Anurag
f63a9325-bd24-4341-8727-42a87cc5a163
Dowling, Ann P.
6d0a4985-4dcf-40bc-a001-b9febb56f7f5
Shin, Ho-Chui
768ef3b2-0d96-4f49-b135-2dd0fde91143
Graham, Will
57b14238-6173-4ce2-8927-ac1ddd4b56a3
Sefi, Sandy
f4a96fef-1016-4cdd-9af1-44034fd724b3
Agarwal, Anurag
f63a9325-bd24-4341-8727-42a87cc5a163
Dowling, Ann P.
6d0a4985-4dcf-40bc-a001-b9febb56f7f5
Shin, Ho-Chui
768ef3b2-0d96-4f49-b135-2dd0fde91143
Graham, Will
57b14238-6173-4ce2-8927-ac1ddd4b56a3
Sefi, Sandy
f4a96fef-1016-4cdd-9af1-44034fd724b3

Agarwal, Anurag, Dowling, Ann P., Shin, Ho-Chui, Graham, Will and Sefi, Sandy (2007) Ray tracing approach to calculate acoustic shielding by a flying wing airframe. AIAA Journal, 45 (5), 1080-1090. (doi:10.2514/1.26000).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The “silent aircraft” is in the form of a flying wing with a large wing planform and a propulsion system that is embedded in the rear of the airframe with intakes on the upper surface of the wing. Thus a large part of the forward propagating noise from the intake ducts is expected to be shielded from observers on the ground by the wing. Acoustic shielding effects can be calculated by solving an external acoustic scattering problem for a moving aircraft. In this paper, acoustic shielding effects of the silent aircraft airframe are quantified by a ray-tracing method. The dominant frequencies from the noise spectrum of the engines are sufficiently high for ray theory to yield accurate results. It is shown that, for low-Mach number homentropic flows, a condition satisfied approximately during takeoff and approach, the acoustic rays propagate in straight lines. Thus, from Fermat’s principle it is clear that classical geometrical optics and geometrical theory of diffraction solutions are applicable to this moving-body problem as well. The total amount of acoustic shielding at an observer located in the shadow region is calculated by adding the contributions from all the diffracted rays (edge-diffracted and creeping rays) and then subtracting the result from the incident field without the airframe. The three-dimensional ray-tracing solver is validated by comparing the numerical solutions with analytical high-frequency asymptotic solutions for canonical shapes. Experiments on a model-scale geometry have been conducted in an anechoic chamber to test the applicability of the ray-tracing technique. The results confirm the accuracy of the approach, which is then applied to a CAD representation of a prototype silent aircraft design. As expected, the flying wing configuration provides very significant ground shielding (in excess of 10 dB at all locations) of a source above the airframe.

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Published date: 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 46372
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/46372
ISSN: 0001-1452
PURE UUID: dd2709bf-5a7a-4c3a-885f-8384a9883059

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Date deposited: 25 Jun 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:03

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