The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Heavy metal removal using polymer immobilised biomass

Heavy metal removal using polymer immobilised biomass
Heavy metal removal using polymer immobilised biomass

A comparative study of the bio-adsorption capacity and kinetics of non viable Rhizopus oryzae (fungal biomass) immobilized in six selected types of polymers (polyvinlformal, polysulfone, alginate, polyacrylamide, k-carrageenan and polyethyleneimine) was undertaken.  The results were compared with those for non immobilised biomass and biomass that had been cultured in the open pore structure of reticulated polyurethane foam. Only the latter method gave a copper uptake capacity equal to that of the free biomass, but this method had the disadvantage that it was necessary to cultivate the fungus in association with the support matrix.

Research was conducted to assess the potential for immobilisation of Rhizopus oryzea and Ascophyllum nodosum (seaweed) into an inert polyurethane carrier matrix during the production process. Two types of polyurethane were used: a conventional hydrophobic polyurethane, and hydrophilic polyurethane (Hypol®).  The conventional hydrophobic foam was found to be unsuitable and exhibited no potential for biosorption of copper from aqueous solution.

Biomass immobilised in Hypol had an adsorptive capacity equal to that of free biomass when compared on a weight basis.  Copper adsorption using both types of biomass immobilised in this way showed good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm model.  Rhizopus oryzae had an adsorption capacity of between 10 and 13 mg Cu.g-1 and Ascophyllum nodosum 39 mg Cu g-1 dry wt.

The immobilised seaweed was used in five consecutive adsorption experiments and showed an initial lowering of adsorption capacity but stabilised at an uptake capacity of 15 mg Cu.g-1 dry wt. by the third re-use. The maximum uptake capacity of the immobilised biomass was shown to be pH dependent whilst temperature had no significant effect.

University of Southampton
Alhakawati, Mohamed Salem
Alhakawati, Mohamed Salem

Alhakawati, Mohamed Salem (2003) Heavy metal removal using polymer immobilised biomass. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

A comparative study of the bio-adsorption capacity and kinetics of non viable Rhizopus oryzae (fungal biomass) immobilized in six selected types of polymers (polyvinlformal, polysulfone, alginate, polyacrylamide, k-carrageenan and polyethyleneimine) was undertaken.  The results were compared with those for non immobilised biomass and biomass that had been cultured in the open pore structure of reticulated polyurethane foam. Only the latter method gave a copper uptake capacity equal to that of the free biomass, but this method had the disadvantage that it was necessary to cultivate the fungus in association with the support matrix.

Research was conducted to assess the potential for immobilisation of Rhizopus oryzea and Ascophyllum nodosum (seaweed) into an inert polyurethane carrier matrix during the production process. Two types of polyurethane were used: a conventional hydrophobic polyurethane, and hydrophilic polyurethane (Hypol®).  The conventional hydrophobic foam was found to be unsuitable and exhibited no potential for biosorption of copper from aqueous solution.

Biomass immobilised in Hypol had an adsorptive capacity equal to that of free biomass when compared on a weight basis.  Copper adsorption using both types of biomass immobilised in this way showed good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm model.  Rhizopus oryzae had an adsorption capacity of between 10 and 13 mg Cu.g-1 and Ascophyllum nodosum 39 mg Cu g-1 dry wt.

The immobilised seaweed was used in five consecutive adsorption experiments and showed an initial lowering of adsorption capacity but stabilised at an uptake capacity of 15 mg Cu.g-1 dry wt. by the third re-use. The maximum uptake capacity of the immobilised biomass was shown to be pH dependent whilst temperature had no significant effect.

Text
895414.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (23MB)

More information

Published date: 2003

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 464952
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/464952
PURE UUID: 1a123b7f-cc67-4106-b773-2ff9f1fa0d57

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 00:13
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 03:46

Export record

Contributors

Author: Mohamed Salem Alhakawati

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×