The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The acquisition of French phonology by adult anglophone learners : perceptions and realities, theory and practice

The acquisition of French phonology by adult anglophone learners : perceptions and realities, theory and practice
The acquisition of French phonology by adult anglophone learners : perceptions and realities, theory and practice

The aim of this thesis is to investigate and evaluate the learning and teaching of French phonology in adult education classes where the learners' first language is Englisli. The thesis focuses on teachers' and learners' views of areas of difficulty and their approach to tliese problems. Related published literature (in particular course materials) is also considered. Information gathered in these areas is related to a survey of actual learner pronunciation. Tlie precise research questions are introduced and an overview of French phonology is provided. A literature review establishes the context of the thesis. A historical background to the questions is presented along with a discussion of goals and criteria for the learning and teaching of pronunciation. The research project is situated in relation to existing literature and the specific challenges facing adult anglophone learners of French. Course materials are evaluated for their approaches to pronunciation. The methodology of the research is outlined and the physical setting and participants are described. Within this framework, the results of surveys of teachers and learners are presented. There follows a detailed study of the pronunciation of a small group of learners. The research findings are discussed to estabUsh tlie extent of agreement between teachers, learners and current literature. The discussion then considers whether the pedagogical challenges are being addressed in a coherent and effective manner. The conclusion relates the findings and discussion to the original research questions. The study concludes that there are many areas of agreement between the various parties, although a small number of significant diffei ences also exist. Classroom activity generally corresponds to perceived problems and this is reflected in many course materials. However, the study of learner pronunciation also reveals a number of gaps and weaknesses in existing practice. The thesis concludes that activity needs broadening in some areas and refining in others. It is argued tliat a consciously eclectic approach is needed to improve existing practice. Finally, the research is evaluated and suggestions for ftutlier woik in the area are outlined.

University of Southampton
Alder, William George
Alder, William George

Alder, William George (2002) The acquisition of French phonology by adult anglophone learners : perceptions and realities, theory and practice. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The aim of this thesis is to investigate and evaluate the learning and teaching of French phonology in adult education classes where the learners' first language is Englisli. The thesis focuses on teachers' and learners' views of areas of difficulty and their approach to tliese problems. Related published literature (in particular course materials) is also considered. Information gathered in these areas is related to a survey of actual learner pronunciation. Tlie precise research questions are introduced and an overview of French phonology is provided. A literature review establishes the context of the thesis. A historical background to the questions is presented along with a discussion of goals and criteria for the learning and teaching of pronunciation. The research project is situated in relation to existing literature and the specific challenges facing adult anglophone learners of French. Course materials are evaluated for their approaches to pronunciation. The methodology of the research is outlined and the physical setting and participants are described. Within this framework, the results of surveys of teachers and learners are presented. There follows a detailed study of the pronunciation of a small group of learners. The research findings are discussed to estabUsh tlie extent of agreement between teachers, learners and current literature. The discussion then considers whether the pedagogical challenges are being addressed in a coherent and effective manner. The conclusion relates the findings and discussion to the original research questions. The study concludes that there are many areas of agreement between the various parties, although a small number of significant diffei ences also exist. Classroom activity generally corresponds to perceived problems and this is reflected in many course materials. However, the study of learner pronunciation also reveals a number of gaps and weaknesses in existing practice. The thesis concludes that activity needs broadening in some areas and refining in others. It is argued tliat a consciously eclectic approach is needed to improve existing practice. Finally, the research is evaluated and suggestions for ftutlier woik in the area are outlined.

Text
909998.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (7MB)

More information

Published date: 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 465092
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/465092
PURE UUID: 55435f6d-aea3-4bd6-b150-63b2fc4bdf72

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 00:22
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 04:11

Export record

Contributors

Author: William George Alder

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×