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The study of motorway operation using a microscopic simulation model

The study of motorway operation using a microscopic simulation model
The study of motorway operation using a microscopic simulation model

This research is concerned with the study of the behaviour of the vehicle/driver combination on motorways, in order to understand the effects which occur at higher flows and the potential to alleviate the problems. A simulation model was developed on the basis of the action point model, where the drivers' thresholds of perception and action were calibrated and measured by analysing vast sets of microscopic data.

A comprehensively instrumented vehicle was used to collect the data for the project. A filter programme was developed for the raw data to overcome the effects of vibration and noise, which occurs due to many dynamic factors and circumstances in collecting the data. Three main situations were distinguished in developing the simulation model:

1) The Approach Process: This is concerned with the behaviour of a driver when approaching slower vehicle ahead. The research shows drivers are more likely to rely on the time-to-collision in controlling their approach process. However, other factors were measured, such as the perception threshold and the deceleration level.

2) The Following Process: This is concerned with the behaviour in close following situation. Many understandings were obtained from the analysis, probably the main one was that drivers tend to follow with shorter headways at high speeds, and no obvious threshold was found for the relative speed. Other behavioural elements investigated included driver speed control and the deceleration level during the close following process.

3) The Lane Changing Process: This is a very complicated process, which has many parameters and factors that are difficult to model. Relative speed and distance were used to determine thresholds for drivers' decisions to change lane. However, a complicated procedure was necessary to achieve a realistic behaviour in the model. The model was validated by comparing the output with the real traffic data.

The calibrated and validated simulation model was further developed to investigate and assess the effects of two different Automatic-Cruse-Control [ACC] systems on traffic on motorways. The research shows that in general ACC systems work better with longer headway in reducing speed and acceleration variation. The comparison between the two tested systems showed that each has its own positive and negative side. Finally the safety benefits of such systems probably cannot be gained until the percentage of the equipped vehicles is very high.

University of Southampton
Sultan, Beshr
59cbf034-09b6-4750-8d09-06ed7e87404c
Sultan, Beshr
59cbf034-09b6-4750-8d09-06ed7e87404c

Sultan, Beshr (2000) The study of motorway operation using a microscopic simulation model. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This research is concerned with the study of the behaviour of the vehicle/driver combination on motorways, in order to understand the effects which occur at higher flows and the potential to alleviate the problems. A simulation model was developed on the basis of the action point model, where the drivers' thresholds of perception and action were calibrated and measured by analysing vast sets of microscopic data.

A comprehensively instrumented vehicle was used to collect the data for the project. A filter programme was developed for the raw data to overcome the effects of vibration and noise, which occurs due to many dynamic factors and circumstances in collecting the data. Three main situations were distinguished in developing the simulation model:

1) The Approach Process: This is concerned with the behaviour of a driver when approaching slower vehicle ahead. The research shows drivers are more likely to rely on the time-to-collision in controlling their approach process. However, other factors were measured, such as the perception threshold and the deceleration level.

2) The Following Process: This is concerned with the behaviour in close following situation. Many understandings were obtained from the analysis, probably the main one was that drivers tend to follow with shorter headways at high speeds, and no obvious threshold was found for the relative speed. Other behavioural elements investigated included driver speed control and the deceleration level during the close following process.

3) The Lane Changing Process: This is a very complicated process, which has many parameters and factors that are difficult to model. Relative speed and distance were used to determine thresholds for drivers' decisions to change lane. However, a complicated procedure was necessary to achieve a realistic behaviour in the model. The model was validated by comparing the output with the real traffic data.

The calibrated and validated simulation model was further developed to investigate and assess the effects of two different Automatic-Cruse-Control [ACC] systems on traffic on motorways. The research shows that in general ACC systems work better with longer headway in reducing speed and acceleration variation. The comparison between the two tested systems showed that each has its own positive and negative side. Finally the safety benefits of such systems probably cannot be gained until the percentage of the equipped vehicles is very high.

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Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 466989
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/466989
PURE UUID: bf232644-e5c8-4c23-8523-4da9be3533c0

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 08:06
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 08:06

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Contributors

Author: Beshr Sultan

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