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Predicting transmissibility of car seats from seat impedance and the apparent mass of the human body

Predicting transmissibility of car seats from seat impedance and the apparent mass of the human body
Predicting transmissibility of car seats from seat impedance and the apparent mass of the human body

Many researchers have considered using a linear mathematical model to represent the seated body apparent mass, but researchers have not considered whether this model can represent the body apparent mass in a wide range of vibration environments. It has been reported that the body apparent mass is affected by sitting posture, footrests, vibration magnitude, vibration spectra and backrests, but some factors have not been investigated. Four experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of seat cushion inclination, hard and soft seats, seat backrests and vibration spectra on measured apparent mass. In each experiment, ten subjects were exposed to 60 seconds of random vibration with a frequency range from 0.5 to 25 Hz. The conclusions were: (i) the effects of seat inclination, hard and soft seat and vibration spectra on body apparent mass are not great and so a simple seated body mathematical model is useful, (ii) the seat backrest has a significant influence on apparent mass so the model parameters must be varied for different backrest conditions, (iii) a change of vibration magnitude revealed a non-linear response of the body, so model modifications are needed for different vibration magnitudes. Four linear models were developed to predict body apparent mass and encouraging results were obtained from two models.

A seat-person model was developed based on the above studies. Three experiments were conducted to compare measured and predicted seat transmissibilities. Eight subjects participated in a laboratory study with a seat and a foam over the frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz; six subjects participated in a field study with three car seats over the frequency range from 1 to 50 Hz. It was found that the seat-person model provided good predictions of seat transmissibilities. However a new model, which includes interaction between the seat backrest and the person, should provide improved predictions of seat transmissibility.

University of Southampton
Wei, Lin
Wei, Lin

Wei, Lin (2000) Predicting transmissibility of car seats from seat impedance and the apparent mass of the human body. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Many researchers have considered using a linear mathematical model to represent the seated body apparent mass, but researchers have not considered whether this model can represent the body apparent mass in a wide range of vibration environments. It has been reported that the body apparent mass is affected by sitting posture, footrests, vibration magnitude, vibration spectra and backrests, but some factors have not been investigated. Four experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of seat cushion inclination, hard and soft seats, seat backrests and vibration spectra on measured apparent mass. In each experiment, ten subjects were exposed to 60 seconds of random vibration with a frequency range from 0.5 to 25 Hz. The conclusions were: (i) the effects of seat inclination, hard and soft seat and vibration spectra on body apparent mass are not great and so a simple seated body mathematical model is useful, (ii) the seat backrest has a significant influence on apparent mass so the model parameters must be varied for different backrest conditions, (iii) a change of vibration magnitude revealed a non-linear response of the body, so model modifications are needed for different vibration magnitudes. Four linear models were developed to predict body apparent mass and encouraging results were obtained from two models.

A seat-person model was developed based on the above studies. Three experiments were conducted to compare measured and predicted seat transmissibilities. Eight subjects participated in a laboratory study with a seat and a foam over the frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz; six subjects participated in a field study with three car seats over the frequency range from 1 to 50 Hz. It was found that the seat-person model provided good predictions of seat transmissibilities. However a new model, which includes interaction between the seat backrest and the person, should provide improved predictions of seat transmissibility.

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Published date: 2000

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Local EPrints ID: 467053
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467053
PURE UUID: 9caa12b0-e2e3-437c-983b-49aa055962e4

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2022 08:10
Last modified: 05 Jul 2022 08:10

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Author: Lin Wei

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