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Microbial diversity associated with four functional groups of benthic reef algae and the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis.

Microbial diversity associated with four functional groups of benthic reef algae and the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis.
Microbial diversity associated with four functional groups of benthic reef algae and the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis.
The coral reef benthos is primarily colonized by corals and algae, which are often in direct competition with one another for space. Numerous studies have shown that coral-associated Bacteria are different from the surrounding seawater and are at least partially species specific (i.e. the same bacterial species on the same coral species). Here we extend these microbial studies to four of the major ecological functional groups of algae found on coral reefs: upright and encrusting calcifying algae, fleshy algae, and turf algae, and compare the results to the communities found on the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis. It was found using 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing that the different algal genera harbour characteristic bacterial communities, and these communities were generally more diverse than those found on corals. While the majority of coral-associated Bacteria were related to known heterotrophs, primarily consuming carbon-rich coral mucus, algal-associated communities harboured a high percentage of autotrophs. The majority of algal-associated autotrophic Bacteria were Cyanobacteria and may be important for nitrogen cycling on the algae. There was also a rich diversity of photosynthetic eukaryotes associated with the algae, including protists, diatoms, and other groups of microalgae. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that coral reefs are a vast landscape of distinctive microbial communities and extend the holobiont concept to benthic algae.
1462-2920
1192-1204
Barott, KL
a724e3ec-1086-4c75-b448-ea62bcd4d11a
Rodriguez-Brito, B
1a318f80-1b24-4e86-96f1-870414094904
Janouškovec, J
fbaa4a5d-872e-465b-b2c3-bb35df455cc6
Marhaver, KL
f3e1490b-3a18-4f9e-8b22-1ae979aaf71b
Smith, JE
84e42ed9-f50a-4c00-8811-9fe07e627441
Keeling, P
fd51c2ef-1daa-442d-b186-71001aa7ca7d
Rohwer, FL
4b9c98f5-83f0-4aa4-aa0c-8bd0780bc17c
Barott, KL
a724e3ec-1086-4c75-b448-ea62bcd4d11a
Rodriguez-Brito, B
1a318f80-1b24-4e86-96f1-870414094904
Janouškovec, J
fbaa4a5d-872e-465b-b2c3-bb35df455cc6
Marhaver, KL
f3e1490b-3a18-4f9e-8b22-1ae979aaf71b
Smith, JE
84e42ed9-f50a-4c00-8811-9fe07e627441
Keeling, P
fd51c2ef-1daa-442d-b186-71001aa7ca7d
Rohwer, FL
4b9c98f5-83f0-4aa4-aa0c-8bd0780bc17c

Barott, KL, Rodriguez-Brito, B, Janouškovec, J, Marhaver, KL, Smith, JE, Keeling, P and Rohwer, FL (2011) Microbial diversity associated with four functional groups of benthic reef algae and the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis. Environmental Microbiology, 13 (5), 1192-1204. (doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02419.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The coral reef benthos is primarily colonized by corals and algae, which are often in direct competition with one another for space. Numerous studies have shown that coral-associated Bacteria are different from the surrounding seawater and are at least partially species specific (i.e. the same bacterial species on the same coral species). Here we extend these microbial studies to four of the major ecological functional groups of algae found on coral reefs: upright and encrusting calcifying algae, fleshy algae, and turf algae, and compare the results to the communities found on the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis. It was found using 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing that the different algal genera harbour characteristic bacterial communities, and these communities were generally more diverse than those found on corals. While the majority of coral-associated Bacteria were related to known heterotrophs, primarily consuming carbon-rich coral mucus, algal-associated communities harboured a high percentage of autotrophs. The majority of algal-associated autotrophic Bacteria were Cyanobacteria and may be important for nitrogen cycling on the algae. There was also a rich diversity of photosynthetic eukaryotes associated with the algae, including protists, diatoms, and other groups of microalgae. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that coral reefs are a vast landscape of distinctive microbial communities and extend the holobiont concept to benthic algae.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 27 January 2011
Published date: 1 May 2011
Additional Information: © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467566
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467566
ISSN: 1462-2920
PURE UUID: 78b76ee7-b66e-4262-ab89-d0c77899f041
ORCID for J Janouškovec: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6547-749X

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Date deposited: 13 Jul 2022 17:16
Last modified: 14 Jul 2022 02:10

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Contributors

Author: KL Barott
Author: B Rodriguez-Brito
Author: J Janouškovec ORCID iD
Author: KL Marhaver
Author: JE Smith
Author: P Keeling
Author: FL Rohwer

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