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An exploratory study of the pedagogical perspective of authoring multimedia artefacts (AMA) in the context of initial English language teacher education (IELTE) in Oman

An exploratory study of the pedagogical perspective of authoring multimedia artefacts (AMA) in the context of initial English language teacher education (IELTE) in Oman
An exploratory study of the pedagogical perspective of authoring multimedia artefacts (AMA) in the context of initial English language teacher education (IELTE) in Oman
Constructivist learning pedagogies are gaining attention and primacy in educational policy framings in Oman, which parallels a growing emphasis in the global pedagogical landscape and the changing sociocultural demands of the 21st century context towards nurturing suitable and adaptable learner competencies. However, the transition from mainstream to constructivist practice is a widely recognised challenge in literature, especially in light of heavily structured educational systems, prominence of teacher-centric pedagogies, the primacy of conceptual and abstract learning, and predispositions toward teaching-for-the-test. These concerns are most relevant to the Higher Education (HE) context in Oman. While this continues to be a rich area of research in the local context, evidence on utilising Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to nurture constructionist learning proved to be scarce in the Omani higher education, particularly in the context of Initial English Language Teacher Education (IELTE). To address this gap, this thesis explores Authoring Multimedia Artefacts (AMA) as a constructionist learning approach in the context of IELTE. The thesis is underpinned by Papertian constructionism as a theoretical and conceptual framework and draws on a qualitative case study design to explore Student-Generated Podcasting (SGP) as a case of AMA-based learning in relation to three areas of inquiry: (a) learner engagement in AMA-based learning, (b) key pedagogical design principles of AMA-based learning, and (c) key learning environment design principles of AMA-based learning. This research study focuses on students’ and academics’ perspectives regarding the three areas of inquiry in an Omani IELTE context and was conducted in four phases. The first phase included a quantitative investigation (using questionnaires) of students and academics’ experiences, views, and perspectives regarding AMA-based learning, drawing on key areas of inquiry from the wider relevant literature. The second phase included a qualitative investigation (using semi-structured interviews) with nineteen students and three teachers to explore their personal experiences, attitudes, insights, and perspectives regarding the three areas of inquiry and to reveal in-depth accounts that take into consideration the interplay of personal, institutional, contextual, and sociocultural factors that influence this area of practice. The third phase included a qualitative analysis of students’ reflective journal entries of their AMA authoring experiences to reveal their experiences and views concerning AMA engagement and AMA pedagogy. The fourth phase included a two-part validation of the research analysis, interpretations, and outcomes by study participants, which consisted of one-to-one interviews and a focus group discussion. This aimed at taking the research outcomes back to participants, involving them in validating the accuracy of the research report and outcomes, allowing them to revisit their views by refining and adding to them, and encouraging them to challenge the analysis by proposing alternate accounts. The study findings revealed a comprehensive attribution of AMA-based learning and challenges associated with the different areas of inquiry: AMA engagement, AMA pedagogical design principles, and AMA learning environment design principles. Both students and academics generally held positive views towards AMA-based learning and suggested valuable implications for sustaining constructionist learning in this context. However, a number of personal, technical, pedagogical, infrastructural, educational, and sociocultural challenges were also identified, suggesting these issues need to be considered to improve AMA-based learning and constructionist learning at large. While the quantitative findings corroborated findings from the wide theoretical and empirical literature, the qualitative findings were especially significant on grounds of their depth, scope, and relevance, especially considering this study of SGP presents pioneering evidence in the IELTE context and the Omani HE context at large. Based on this, the findings from qualitative analysis consequently fed into the development of an operational framework for AMA-based learning to help in the systematic design and implementation of this approach, and by doing so the study findings contribute to filling a current gap in research regarding conceptualising and empirically analysing AMA-based learning enablers and inhibitors. The outcomes of this research are particularly significant in the context of constructionist learning environments, pedagogies, as well as strategies. The most notable significance is attributed to the orienting model and framework for AMA-based learning, which is necessary to fill the relative gap in orienting frameworks grounded in Papert’s theory of constructionism. The findings of the study have significant implications for integrating AMA-based learning into pedagogical practice, facilitating constructivist-constructionist pedagogical approaches, promoting active and deep learning, and harnessing the constructivist-constructionist potentials of ICT-mediated learning. They also have implications for teacher-education programmes in Oman, especially where developing active, deep, and productive learning skills is concerned, all of which are areas highly emphasised in the goals and objectives of educational policy and reform. As such, the study underscores a need to promote constructionist learning in the IELTE programme by considering the key enabling factors of AMA-based learning and the potential challenges that could inhibit this endeavour.
University of Southampton
Al Hasani, Abdullah Said Hamed
dd70942e-a211-4591-b7fc-d1f508e85abe
Al Hasani, Abdullah Said Hamed
dd70942e-a211-4591-b7fc-d1f508e85abe
Dyke, Martin
5a5dbd02-39c5-41e0-ba89-a55f61c9cb39

Al Hasani, Abdullah Said Hamed (2022) An exploratory study of the pedagogical perspective of authoring multimedia artefacts (AMA) in the context of initial English language teacher education (IELTE) in Oman. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 376pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Constructivist learning pedagogies are gaining attention and primacy in educational policy framings in Oman, which parallels a growing emphasis in the global pedagogical landscape and the changing sociocultural demands of the 21st century context towards nurturing suitable and adaptable learner competencies. However, the transition from mainstream to constructivist practice is a widely recognised challenge in literature, especially in light of heavily structured educational systems, prominence of teacher-centric pedagogies, the primacy of conceptual and abstract learning, and predispositions toward teaching-for-the-test. These concerns are most relevant to the Higher Education (HE) context in Oman. While this continues to be a rich area of research in the local context, evidence on utilising Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to nurture constructionist learning proved to be scarce in the Omani higher education, particularly in the context of Initial English Language Teacher Education (IELTE). To address this gap, this thesis explores Authoring Multimedia Artefacts (AMA) as a constructionist learning approach in the context of IELTE. The thesis is underpinned by Papertian constructionism as a theoretical and conceptual framework and draws on a qualitative case study design to explore Student-Generated Podcasting (SGP) as a case of AMA-based learning in relation to three areas of inquiry: (a) learner engagement in AMA-based learning, (b) key pedagogical design principles of AMA-based learning, and (c) key learning environment design principles of AMA-based learning. This research study focuses on students’ and academics’ perspectives regarding the three areas of inquiry in an Omani IELTE context and was conducted in four phases. The first phase included a quantitative investigation (using questionnaires) of students and academics’ experiences, views, and perspectives regarding AMA-based learning, drawing on key areas of inquiry from the wider relevant literature. The second phase included a qualitative investigation (using semi-structured interviews) with nineteen students and three teachers to explore their personal experiences, attitudes, insights, and perspectives regarding the three areas of inquiry and to reveal in-depth accounts that take into consideration the interplay of personal, institutional, contextual, and sociocultural factors that influence this area of practice. The third phase included a qualitative analysis of students’ reflective journal entries of their AMA authoring experiences to reveal their experiences and views concerning AMA engagement and AMA pedagogy. The fourth phase included a two-part validation of the research analysis, interpretations, and outcomes by study participants, which consisted of one-to-one interviews and a focus group discussion. This aimed at taking the research outcomes back to participants, involving them in validating the accuracy of the research report and outcomes, allowing them to revisit their views by refining and adding to them, and encouraging them to challenge the analysis by proposing alternate accounts. The study findings revealed a comprehensive attribution of AMA-based learning and challenges associated with the different areas of inquiry: AMA engagement, AMA pedagogical design principles, and AMA learning environment design principles. Both students and academics generally held positive views towards AMA-based learning and suggested valuable implications for sustaining constructionist learning in this context. However, a number of personal, technical, pedagogical, infrastructural, educational, and sociocultural challenges were also identified, suggesting these issues need to be considered to improve AMA-based learning and constructionist learning at large. While the quantitative findings corroborated findings from the wide theoretical and empirical literature, the qualitative findings were especially significant on grounds of their depth, scope, and relevance, especially considering this study of SGP presents pioneering evidence in the IELTE context and the Omani HE context at large. Based on this, the findings from qualitative analysis consequently fed into the development of an operational framework for AMA-based learning to help in the systematic design and implementation of this approach, and by doing so the study findings contribute to filling a current gap in research regarding conceptualising and empirically analysing AMA-based learning enablers and inhibitors. The outcomes of this research are particularly significant in the context of constructionist learning environments, pedagogies, as well as strategies. The most notable significance is attributed to the orienting model and framework for AMA-based learning, which is necessary to fill the relative gap in orienting frameworks grounded in Papert’s theory of constructionism. The findings of the study have significant implications for integrating AMA-based learning into pedagogical practice, facilitating constructivist-constructionist pedagogical approaches, promoting active and deep learning, and harnessing the constructivist-constructionist potentials of ICT-mediated learning. They also have implications for teacher-education programmes in Oman, especially where developing active, deep, and productive learning skills is concerned, all of which are areas highly emphasised in the goals and objectives of educational policy and reform. As such, the study underscores a need to promote constructionist learning in the IELTE programme by considering the key enabling factors of AMA-based learning and the potential challenges that could inhibit this endeavour.

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Submitted date: October 2021
Published date: 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467752
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467752
PURE UUID: 1f20c326-40a9-4c61-b1a7-3447fb25fe10
ORCID for Abdullah Said Hamed Al Hasani: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9847-6290

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Date deposited: 21 Jul 2022 17:02
Last modified: 27 Jul 2022 01:51

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Contributors

Author: Abdullah Said Hamed Al Hasani ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Martin Dyke

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