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Poor Sleep Quality Is Significantly Associated With Effort but Not Temporal Discounting of Monetary Rewards

Poor Sleep Quality Is Significantly Associated With Effort but Not Temporal Discounting of Monetary Rewards
Poor Sleep Quality Is Significantly Associated With Effort but Not Temporal Discounting of Monetary Rewards

Experimental sleep deprivation has been shown to differentially affect behavioral indices of effort and temporal discounting, 2 domains of reward processing often observed to be impaired in depression. Experimental sleep deprivation is phenomenologically different from sleep deprivation in everyday life (e.g., poor quality sleep or habitual short sleep duration). Thus, experimental findings may not explain how sleep disturbance impacts reward processing in everyday life. The present study examined associations of past-month self-reported typical sleep quality and duration among 325 young adults who completed behavioral tasks of effort and temporal discounting. Analyses accounted for the potential influence of self-reported mood symptoms and reward sensitivity. Results showed that poorer sleep quality, but not shorter sleep duration, was associated with less preference for high effort/high reward choices on the Effort Expenditure for Reward task (EEfRT) and was significant when accounting for depression and reward sensitivity, neither of which significantly predicted effort. Neither poorer sleep quality nor shorter sleep duration was significantly associated with a preference for smaller, more immediate reward on a delay discounting task. Findings suggest sleep quality, irrespective of total hours of sleep, may independently affect reward-relevant effort, which may have implications for the study and treatment of depression.

Depression, Effort, Reward processing, Sleep
2333-8113
70-76
Boland, Elaine M.
6a671295-09f7-45a2-aa91-4438c848a75f
Kelley, Nicholas J.
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Chat, Iris Ka Yi
47b0185b-3a34-4ea3-809a-2ba228779f86
Zinbarg, Richard
57d9d1a0-5ec4-42ae-b3ee-a66767220f2d
Craske, Michelle G.
73ebe43a-d149-4bd1-a1ce-8cc69e8c3929
Bookheimer, Susan
f48f15ba-7ff0-4b9c-b1c4-0e11eaf763de
Nusslock, Robin
e254120f-5efa-4ab7-81c6-5f85d510aaee
Boland, Elaine M.
6a671295-09f7-45a2-aa91-4438c848a75f
Kelley, Nicholas J.
445e767b-ad9f-44f2-b2c6-d981482bb90b
Chat, Iris Ka Yi
47b0185b-3a34-4ea3-809a-2ba228779f86
Zinbarg, Richard
57d9d1a0-5ec4-42ae-b3ee-a66767220f2d
Craske, Michelle G.
73ebe43a-d149-4bd1-a1ce-8cc69e8c3929
Bookheimer, Susan
f48f15ba-7ff0-4b9c-b1c4-0e11eaf763de
Nusslock, Robin
e254120f-5efa-4ab7-81c6-5f85d510aaee

Boland, Elaine M., Kelley, Nicholas J., Chat, Iris Ka Yi, Zinbarg, Richard, Craske, Michelle G., Bookheimer, Susan and Nusslock, Robin (2022) Poor Sleep Quality Is Significantly Associated With Effort but Not Temporal Discounting of Monetary Rewards. Motivation Science, 8 (1), 70-76. (doi:10.1037/mot0000258).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Experimental sleep deprivation has been shown to differentially affect behavioral indices of effort and temporal discounting, 2 domains of reward processing often observed to be impaired in depression. Experimental sleep deprivation is phenomenologically different from sleep deprivation in everyday life (e.g., poor quality sleep or habitual short sleep duration). Thus, experimental findings may not explain how sleep disturbance impacts reward processing in everyday life. The present study examined associations of past-month self-reported typical sleep quality and duration among 325 young adults who completed behavioral tasks of effort and temporal discounting. Analyses accounted for the potential influence of self-reported mood symptoms and reward sensitivity. Results showed that poorer sleep quality, but not shorter sleep duration, was associated with less preference for high effort/high reward choices on the Effort Expenditure for Reward task (EEfRT) and was significant when accounting for depression and reward sensitivity, neither of which significantly predicted effort. Neither poorer sleep quality nor shorter sleep duration was significantly associated with a preference for smaller, more immediate reward on a delay discounting task. Findings suggest sleep quality, irrespective of total hours of sleep, may independently affect reward-relevant effort, which may have implications for the study and treatment of depression.

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More information

Published date: March 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: We have no conflicts of interest to disclose. This research was supported by Grant R01-MH100117-01A1 from National Institute of Mental Health (PIs: Craske, Bookheimer, Nusslock, Zinbarg). Preparation of this article was supported by Grant IK2 CX001501 from the Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Science Research and Development Service (PI: Elaine M. Boland). The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not represent the official views of the US government. Data is available upon request per National Institutes of Health policy. Publisher Copyright: © 2022,Motivation Science. All Rights Reserved.
Keywords: Depression, Effort, Reward processing, Sleep

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467942
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467942
ISSN: 2333-8113
PURE UUID: f167f349-caa7-48ea-8e6d-61b64c5adca0

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Date deposited: 26 Jul 2022 16:37
Last modified: 09 Nov 2022 18:08

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Contributors

Author: Elaine M. Boland
Author: Iris Ka Yi Chat
Author: Richard Zinbarg
Author: Michelle G. Craske
Author: Susan Bookheimer
Author: Robin Nusslock

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