The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

COVID-19 and health-related authority allocation puzzles

COVID-19 and health-related authority allocation puzzles
COVID-19 and health-related authority allocation puzzles
COVID-19-related controversies concerning the allocation of scarce resources, travel restrictions, and physical distancing norms each raise a foundational question: How should authority, and thus responsibility, over healthcare and public health law and policy be allocated? Each controversy raises principles that support claims by traditional wielders of authority in “federal” countries, like federal and state governments, and less traditional entities, like cities and sub-state nations. No existing principle divides “healthcare and public law and policy” into units that can be allocated in intuitively compelling ways. This leads to puzzles concerning (a) the principles for justifiably allocating “powers” in these domains and (b) whether and how they change during “emergencies.” This work motivates the puzzles, explains why resolving them should be part of long-term responses to COVID-19, and outlines some initial COVID-19-related findings that shed light on justifiable authority allocation, emergencies, emergency powers, and the relationships between them.
Authority, COVID-19, Health Policy, Social Policy, Bioethics
0963-1801
25-36
Da Silva, Michael
05ad649f-8409-4012-8edc-88709b1a3182
Da Silva, Michael
05ad649f-8409-4012-8edc-88709b1a3182

Da Silva, Michael (2020) COVID-19 and health-related authority allocation puzzles. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 30 (1), 25-36.

Record type: Article

Abstract

COVID-19-related controversies concerning the allocation of scarce resources, travel restrictions, and physical distancing norms each raise a foundational question: How should authority, and thus responsibility, over healthcare and public health law and policy be allocated? Each controversy raises principles that support claims by traditional wielders of authority in “federal” countries, like federal and state governments, and less traditional entities, like cities and sub-state nations. No existing principle divides “healthcare and public law and policy” into units that can be allocated in intuitively compelling ways. This leads to puzzles concerning (a) the principles for justifiably allocating “powers” in these domains and (b) whether and how they change during “emergencies.” This work motivates the puzzles, explains why resolving them should be part of long-term responses to COVID-19, and outlines some initial COVID-19-related findings that shed light on justifiable authority allocation, emergencies, emergency powers, and the relationships between them.

Text
Da Silva CQHE AM - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Text
covid-19-and-health-related-authority-allocation-puzzles - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (138kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 May 2020
Published date: 8 June 2020
Keywords: Authority, COVID-19, Health Policy, Social Policy, Bioethics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467948
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467948
ISSN: 0963-1801
PURE UUID: 05a626bc-d434-4808-88d4-6e1f1a8e4b8f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Jul 2022 16:51
Last modified: 26 Jul 2022 16:51

Export record

Contributors

Author: Michael Da Silva

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×