The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Skin wetness sensitivity across body sites commonly affected by pain in people with migraine

Skin wetness sensitivity across body sites commonly affected by pain in people with migraine
Skin wetness sensitivity across body sites commonly affected by pain in people with migraine

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate skin wetness perception and thermal sensitivity in people with migraine and similar healthy controls.

BACKGROUND: Environmental triggers, such as cold and humidity, are known triggers for pain in people with migraine. Sensory inputs might be implicated in such heightened responses to cold-humid environments, such that a migraine-induced hypersensitivity to cold wetness could be present in people with migraine. However, we lack empirical evidence on skin thermal and wetness sensitivity across skin sites commonly associated with reported pain in migraine, such as the forehead.

METHODS: This prospective cross-sectional observational study, conducted in a university hospital setting, evaluated skin wetness perceptions and thermal sensations to wet non-noxious warm-wet, neutral-wet, and cold-wet stimuli applied to the forehead, the posterior neck, and the index finger pad of 12 patients with migraine (mean and standard deviation for age 44.5 ± 13.2 years, 7/12 [58%] women) and 36 healthy controls (mean and standard deviation for age 39.4 ± 14.6 years, 18/36 [50%] women).

RESULTS: On the forehead, people with migraine reported a significantly higher wetness perception than healthy controls across all thermal stimulus (15.1 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8 to 28.5, p = 0.027, corresponding to ~ 15% difference), whereas no significant differences were found on the posterior neck nor on the index finger pad. We found no differences among groups in overall thermal sensations (-8.3 mm, 95% CI: -24.0 to 7.3, p = 0.291; -7.8 mm, 95% CI: -25.3 to 9.7, p = 0.375; and 12.4 mm, 95% CI: -4.0 to 28.9, p = 0.133; forehead, posterior neck, and index finger, respectively).

CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that people with migraine have a heightened sensitivity to skin wetness on the forehead area only, which is where pain attacks occur. Future studies should further explore the underlying mechanisms (e.g., TRPM8-mediated cold-wet allodynia) that lead to greater perception of wetness in people with migraine to better understand the role of environmental triggers in migraine.

headache, humidity, hygrosensation, pain, sensory testing
1526-4610
737-747
Buoite Stella, Alex
5bcc50a8-f4a5-4182-9815-8da38d105df4
Filingeri, Davide
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24
Garascia, Gabriele
b08d8f5f-7006-4fda-a18c-5954d412538c
D'Acunto, Laura
07cda938-197e-48ce-884c-b9b181e3954a
Furlanis, Giovanni
b1f71a91-7f93-457b-925d-07a06b4012ac
Granato, Antonio
af28a351-77dd-4e6c-8bc6-055cff69f952
Manganotti, Paolo
053b0917-efc3-4c67-a69f-3009f84961c6
Buoite Stella, Alex
5bcc50a8-f4a5-4182-9815-8da38d105df4
Filingeri, Davide
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24
Garascia, Gabriele
b08d8f5f-7006-4fda-a18c-5954d412538c
D'Acunto, Laura
07cda938-197e-48ce-884c-b9b181e3954a
Furlanis, Giovanni
b1f71a91-7f93-457b-925d-07a06b4012ac
Granato, Antonio
af28a351-77dd-4e6c-8bc6-055cff69f952
Manganotti, Paolo
053b0917-efc3-4c67-a69f-3009f84961c6

Buoite Stella, Alex, Filingeri, Davide, Garascia, Gabriele, D'Acunto, Laura, Furlanis, Giovanni, Granato, Antonio and Manganotti, Paolo (2022) Skin wetness sensitivity across body sites commonly affected by pain in people with migraine. Headache, 62 (6), 737-747. (doi:10.1111/head.14323).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate skin wetness perception and thermal sensitivity in people with migraine and similar healthy controls.

BACKGROUND: Environmental triggers, such as cold and humidity, are known triggers for pain in people with migraine. Sensory inputs might be implicated in such heightened responses to cold-humid environments, such that a migraine-induced hypersensitivity to cold wetness could be present in people with migraine. However, we lack empirical evidence on skin thermal and wetness sensitivity across skin sites commonly associated with reported pain in migraine, such as the forehead.

METHODS: This prospective cross-sectional observational study, conducted in a university hospital setting, evaluated skin wetness perceptions and thermal sensations to wet non-noxious warm-wet, neutral-wet, and cold-wet stimuli applied to the forehead, the posterior neck, and the index finger pad of 12 patients with migraine (mean and standard deviation for age 44.5 ± 13.2 years, 7/12 [58%] women) and 36 healthy controls (mean and standard deviation for age 39.4 ± 14.6 years, 18/36 [50%] women).

RESULTS: On the forehead, people with migraine reported a significantly higher wetness perception than healthy controls across all thermal stimulus (15.1 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.8 to 28.5, p = 0.027, corresponding to ~ 15% difference), whereas no significant differences were found on the posterior neck nor on the index finger pad. We found no differences among groups in overall thermal sensations (-8.3 mm, 95% CI: -24.0 to 7.3, p = 0.291; -7.8 mm, 95% CI: -25.3 to 9.7, p = 0.375; and 12.4 mm, 95% CI: -4.0 to 28.9, p = 0.133; forehead, posterior neck, and index finger, respectively).

CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that people with migraine have a heightened sensitivity to skin wetness on the forehead area only, which is where pain attacks occur. Future studies should further explore the underlying mechanisms (e.g., TRPM8-mediated cold-wet allodynia) that lead to greater perception of wetness in people with migraine to better understand the role of environmental triggers in migraine.

Text
2022_WetnessMigraine_Headache - Version of Record
Download (846kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 April 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 June 2022
Published date: June 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: No funding or financial support was provided for this study Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Authors. Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Headache Society.
Keywords: headache, humidity, hygrosensation, pain, sensory testing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 467978
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/467978
ISSN: 1526-4610
PURE UUID: 7f024114-1d40-48e5-bf32-6c906b3e5e2e
ORCID for Davide Filingeri: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5652-395X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jul 2022 16:41
Last modified: 11 Aug 2022 02:03

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Alex Buoite Stella
Author: Gabriele Garascia
Author: Laura D'Acunto
Author: Giovanni Furlanis
Author: Antonio Granato
Author: Paolo Manganotti

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×