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The return of the membrane paradigm? Black holes and strings in the water tap

The return of the membrane paradigm? Black holes and strings in the water tap
The return of the membrane paradigm? Black holes and strings in the water tap
Several general arguments indicate that the event horizon behaves as a stretched membrane. We propose using this relation to understand the gravity and dynamics of black objects in higher dimensions. We provide evidence that:

(i) The gravitational Gregory–Laflamme instability has a classical counterpart in the Rayleigh–Plateau instability of fluids. Each known feature of the gravitational instability can be accounted for in the fluid model. These features include threshold mode, dispersion relation, time evolution and critical dimension of certain phase transitions. Thus, we argue that black strings break in much the same way as water from a faucet breaks up into small droplets.

(ii) General rotating black holes can also be understood with this analogy. In particular, instability and bifurcation diagrams for black objects can easily be inferred.

This correspondence can and should be used as a guiding tool for understanding and exploring the physics of gravity in higher dimensions.
505-511
Cardoso, Vitor
08c1bdef-b56a-4067-ab37-89a9ece74fb7
Dias, Oscar J.C.
f01a8d9b-9597-4c32-9226-53a6e5500a54
Gualtieri, Leonardo
a0183007-8cfc-4cdd-a392-3492ec6b7c22
Cardoso, Vitor
08c1bdef-b56a-4067-ab37-89a9ece74fb7
Dias, Oscar J.C.
f01a8d9b-9597-4c32-9226-53a6e5500a54
Gualtieri, Leonardo
a0183007-8cfc-4cdd-a392-3492ec6b7c22

Cardoso, Vitor, Dias, Oscar J.C. and Gualtieri, Leonardo (2008) The return of the membrane paradigm? Black holes and strings in the water tap. Int.J.Mod.Phys.D, 17 (3-4), 505-511. (doi:10.1142/S0218271808012176).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Several general arguments indicate that the event horizon behaves as a stretched membrane. We propose using this relation to understand the gravity and dynamics of black objects in higher dimensions. We provide evidence that:

(i) The gravitational Gregory–Laflamme instability has a classical counterpart in the Rayleigh–Plateau instability of fluids. Each known feature of the gravitational instability can be accounted for in the fluid model. These features include threshold mode, dispersion relation, time evolution and critical dimension of certain phase transitions. Thus, we argue that black strings break in much the same way as water from a faucet breaks up into small droplets.

(ii) General rotating black holes can also be understood with this analogy. In particular, instability and bifurcation diagrams for black objects can easily be inferred.

This correspondence can and should be used as a guiding tool for understanding and exploring the physics of gravity in higher dimensions.

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More information

Published date: 1 March 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468097
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468097
PURE UUID: 4e223989-997d-4af8-8f1b-5fd74bfa1ff4
ORCID for Oscar J.C. Dias: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-4750

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Date deposited: 02 Aug 2022 17:04
Last modified: 03 Aug 2022 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Vitor Cardoso
Author: Oscar J.C. Dias ORCID iD
Author: Leonardo Gualtieri

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