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Toward a new principle of agent engineering in multiagent systems: Computational equivalence

Toward a new principle of agent engineering in multiagent systems: Computational equivalence
Toward a new principle of agent engineering in multiagent systems: Computational equivalence
Agent-based Methodology (ABM) is becoming indispensable for the inter-disciplinary study of social and economic complex adaptive systems. The essence of ABM lies in the notion of autonomous agents whose behavior may evolve endogenously and can generate and mimic the corresponding complex system dynamics that the ABM is studying. Over the past decade, many computational intelligence (CI) methods have been applied to the design of autonomous agents, in particular, their adaptive scheme. This design issue is non-trivial since the chosen adaptive schemes usually have great impact on the generated system dynamics. Robert Lucas, one of the most influential modern economic theorists, has suggested using laboratories with human agents, also known as Experimental Economics, to help solving the design issue. While this is a promising approach, laboratories used in the current experimental economics is not computationally equipped to meet the demands of the task. This paper attempts to materialize Lucas’ suggestion by establishing a laboratory where human subjects are equipped with the computational power that satisfies the computational equivalence conditions.
18-32
Springer
Chen, Shu-Heng
13f75ac4-9eeb-4601-b72a-edb0784d112b
Tai, Chung-Ching
b3370b23-7410-4254-99bc-6711046e1095
Chen, Shu-Heng
13f75ac4-9eeb-4601-b72a-edb0784d112b
Tai, Chung-Ching
b3370b23-7410-4254-99bc-6711046e1095

Chen, Shu-Heng and Tai, Chung-Ching (2003) Toward a new principle of agent engineering in multiagent systems: Computational equivalence. In, Multi-agent for mass user support: International workshop on multi-agents for mass user support, MAMUS 2003. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 3012) Springer, pp. 18-32. (doi:10.1007/978-3-540-24666-4_2).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Agent-based Methodology (ABM) is becoming indispensable for the inter-disciplinary study of social and economic complex adaptive systems. The essence of ABM lies in the notion of autonomous agents whose behavior may evolve endogenously and can generate and mimic the corresponding complex system dynamics that the ABM is studying. Over the past decade, many computational intelligence (CI) methods have been applied to the design of autonomous agents, in particular, their adaptive scheme. This design issue is non-trivial since the chosen adaptive schemes usually have great impact on the generated system dynamics. Robert Lucas, one of the most influential modern economic theorists, has suggested using laboratories with human agents, also known as Experimental Economics, to help solving the design issue. While this is a promising approach, laboratories used in the current experimental economics is not computationally equipped to meet the demands of the task. This paper attempts to materialize Lucas’ suggestion by establishing a laboratory where human subjects are equipped with the computational power that satisfies the computational equivalence conditions.

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Published date: 2003

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Local EPrints ID: 468218
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468218
PURE UUID: f5fa7052-d83e-4a1b-8724-55668699457f
ORCID for Chung-Ching Tai: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2557-177X

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Date deposited: 05 Aug 2022 16:55
Last modified: 06 Aug 2022 02:00

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Contributors

Author: Shu-Heng Chen
Author: Chung-Ching Tai ORCID iD

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