The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The Impact of changing working patterns for police personnel in England and Wales during COVID19 lockdown one

The Impact of changing working patterns for police personnel in England and Wales during COVID19 lockdown one
The Impact of changing working patterns for police personnel in England and Wales during COVID19 lockdown one
A national health emergency coupled with public order and restraint imperatives compounded the levels of stress in policing. In England and Wales new working patterns were negotiated to manage the constraints of a different working environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. This chapter explores the impacts of the COVID lockdown restrictions on police personnel in Lockdown 1 utilising five themes: preparedness and protection; relationships with the public; changing work demands; communication; and support. Empirical data comprising the qualitative comments of front-line police personnel derived from a broader online national survey are reported to illustrate sentiment towards these issues. The qualitative data suggests that frustration and disappointment, combined with changing work practices and a perceived disconnection with the public heightened stress levels in those working on the frontline during Lockdown 1.
Routledge
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19
Brown, Jennifer
93bd3dc4-c198-47cb-9bd7-56f6e1374be3
Wright, Martin
Cordener, Gary
Fleming, Jenny
61449384-ccab-40b3-b494-0852c956ca19
Brown, Jennifer
93bd3dc4-c198-47cb-9bd7-56f6e1374be3
Wright, Martin
Cordener, Gary

Fleming, Jenny and Brown, Jennifer (2022) The Impact of changing working patterns for police personnel in England and Wales during COVID19 lockdown one. In, Wright, Martin and Cordener, Gary (eds.) Routledge Handbook of ‘Policing Within a Crisis’. Abingdon, Oxon. Routledge. (In Press)

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

A national health emergency coupled with public order and restraint imperatives compounded the levels of stress in policing. In England and Wales new working patterns were negotiated to manage the constraints of a different working environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. This chapter explores the impacts of the COVID lockdown restrictions on police personnel in Lockdown 1 utilising five themes: preparedness and protection; relationships with the public; changing work demands; communication; and support. Empirical data comprising the qualitative comments of front-line police personnel derived from a broader online national survey are reported to illustrate sentiment towards these issues. The qualitative data suggests that frustration and disappointment, combined with changing work practices and a perceived disconnection with the public heightened stress levels in those working on the frontline during Lockdown 1.

Text
Routledge Handbook FINAL Fleming Brown docx - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468230
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468230
PURE UUID: a0c6ee1e-f08c-4d9c-84ee-a79d9c68e9fc
ORCID for Jenny Fleming: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7913-3345

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Aug 2022 16:37
Last modified: 09 Aug 2022 01:46

Export record

Contributors

Author: Jenny Fleming ORCID iD
Author: Jennifer Brown
Editor: Martin Wright
Editor: Gary Cordener

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×