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Too much information: An examination of the effects of social self-disclosure embedded within influencer eWOM campaigns

Too much information: An examination of the effects of social self-disclosure embedded within influencer eWOM campaigns
Too much information: An examination of the effects of social self-disclosure embedded within influencer eWOM campaigns

Social media influencers (SMIs) offer a unique form of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), disclosing personal information (e.g., daily routines, major life events) as part of their pitch when promoting products. To date, no research has explored if, and how, social self-disclosure impacts the way recipients respond to promotions and the influencer themselves. Through four studies deploying a mixed method design (total N = 888), we redress this knowledge gap. We find that increased depth and breadth in social self-disclosure is viewed as inappropriate, reducing trust and purchase intent. We further validate appropriateness as the critical mediator in understanding the impact of self-disclosure within this marketing context. We also establish that the context of the post (sponsored vs non-sponsored) and the audiences’ social media usage intensity together act as a boundary condition to the effects of high self-disclosure by SMI's.

Appropriateness, Influencer, Self-disclosure, Social Media, Sponsored, eWOM
0148-2963
93-105
AlRabiah, Sara
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Marder, Ben
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Marshall, David
bb184a5c-a387-41d3-9d1d-3cd9ab87badf
Angell, Rob
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674
AlRabiah, Sara
b6781bf6-fb1f-429e-8225-2990db7d63f4
Marder, Ben
6c556d4a-af17-4625-b03b-fe84159fdf2d
Marshall, David
bb184a5c-a387-41d3-9d1d-3cd9ab87badf
Angell, Rob
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674

AlRabiah, Sara, Marder, Ben, Marshall, David and Angell, Rob (2022) Too much information: An examination of the effects of social self-disclosure embedded within influencer eWOM campaigns. Journal of Business Research, 152, 93-105. (doi:10.1016/j.jbusres.2022.07.029).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Social media influencers (SMIs) offer a unique form of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), disclosing personal information (e.g., daily routines, major life events) as part of their pitch when promoting products. To date, no research has explored if, and how, social self-disclosure impacts the way recipients respond to promotions and the influencer themselves. Through four studies deploying a mixed method design (total N = 888), we redress this knowledge gap. We find that increased depth and breadth in social self-disclosure is viewed as inappropriate, reducing trust and purchase intent. We further validate appropriateness as the critical mediator in understanding the impact of self-disclosure within this marketing context. We also establish that the context of the post (sponsored vs non-sponsored) and the audiences’ social media usage intensity together act as a boundary condition to the effects of high self-disclosure by SMI's.

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Accepted/In Press date: 13 July 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 July 2022
Published date: 1 November 2022
Additional Information: Publisher Copyright: © 2022 Elsevier Inc.
Keywords: Appropriateness, Influencer, Self-disclosure, Social Media, Sponsored, eWOM

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468289
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468289
ISSN: 0148-2963
PURE UUID: 5385a2e5-eeab-4807-a487-74a6641220b6
ORCID for Rob Angell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8554-2092

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Aug 2022 16:55
Last modified: 03 Sep 2022 02:03

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Contributors

Author: Sara AlRabiah
Author: Ben Marder
Author: David Marshall
Author: Rob Angell ORCID iD

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