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Spatial and temporal variations in shoreline changes of the Niger Delta during 1986–2019

Spatial and temporal variations in shoreline changes of the Niger Delta during 1986–2019
Spatial and temporal variations in shoreline changes of the Niger Delta during 1986–2019
The purpose of this study was to analyse the shoreline movement of the Niger delta, specifically focusing on the spatial pattern of the delta’s shoreline behaviour during 1986–2019. We employed satellite data of medium spatial resolution (20–30 m) to delimit the delta shorelines representing specific time in order to determine the rates of the delta shoreline migration. Our results show that the delta shoreline has changed nearly in equal proportion between erosion (50.3%) and accretion (49.7%), at mean (maximum) rates of 3.9 m/yr. (26 m/yr.) of erosion, and 4.0 m/yr.
(27 m/yr.) of accretion. Further analysis indicates that the highest shoreline migration is seaward (>200 m) though the ratio of the shoreline distance in recession (54%) exceeds that which is in accretion. Our analysis did not reveal any entrenched spatial pattern of shoreline behaviour but rather highlights a random occurrence of hotspots in both shoreline erosion and accretion over space
and time. We have also showed that by applying the statistical mean-removed shoreline approach, the overall trend of a delta shoreline movement can be vividly discriminated. In conclusion, since the Niger delta shoreline dynamics is most intense at the delta river mouths, we suggest this is likely due to the interaction between waves and river discharge in these locations.
203-220
Afolabi, Matthew, Rotimi
f476c3bc-d803-4610-90c1-81cdb0ce8acf
Darby, Stephen
4c3e1c76-d404-4ff3-86f8-84e42fbb7970
Afolabi, Matthew, Rotimi
f476c3bc-d803-4610-90c1-81cdb0ce8acf
Darby, Stephen
4c3e1c76-d404-4ff3-86f8-84e42fbb7970

Afolabi, Matthew, Rotimi and Darby, Stephen (2022) Spatial and temporal variations in shoreline changes of the Niger Delta during 1986–2019. Coasts, 2, 203-220. (doi:10.3390/coasts2030010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyse the shoreline movement of the Niger delta, specifically focusing on the spatial pattern of the delta’s shoreline behaviour during 1986–2019. We employed satellite data of medium spatial resolution (20–30 m) to delimit the delta shorelines representing specific time in order to determine the rates of the delta shoreline migration. Our results show that the delta shoreline has changed nearly in equal proportion between erosion (50.3%) and accretion (49.7%), at mean (maximum) rates of 3.9 m/yr. (26 m/yr.) of erosion, and 4.0 m/yr.
(27 m/yr.) of accretion. Further analysis indicates that the highest shoreline migration is seaward (>200 m) though the ratio of the shoreline distance in recession (54%) exceeds that which is in accretion. Our analysis did not reveal any entrenched spatial pattern of shoreline behaviour but rather highlights a random occurrence of hotspots in both shoreline erosion and accretion over space
and time. We have also showed that by applying the statistical mean-removed shoreline approach, the overall trend of a delta shoreline movement can be vividly discriminated. In conclusion, since the Niger delta shoreline dynamics is most intense at the delta river mouths, we suggest this is likely due to the interaction between waves and river discharge in these locations.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 July 2022
Published date: 13 July 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468435
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468435
PURE UUID: 0dbcdc2f-d971-4b83-9402-63f832c590f2
ORCID for Stephen Darby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8778-4394

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Date deposited: 15 Aug 2022 16:43
Last modified: 16 Aug 2022 01:34

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