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Developmental variation in whole human lung phosphatidylcholine molecular species: A comparison with guinea pig and rat

Developmental variation in whole human lung phosphatidylcholine molecular species: A comparison with guinea pig and rat
Developmental variation in whole human lung phosphatidylcholine molecular species: A comparison with guinea pig and rat
Detailed analysis of the pattern of human and rodent lung phosphatidylcholine (PC) species during fetal development revealed a progressive increase in two disaturated species. The rise in the fractional content of dipalmitoyl PC (PC16:0/16:0) and myristoylpalmitoyl PC (PC14:0/16:0) was accompanied at each time point by a fall of similar magnitude in palmitoyloleoyl PC (PC16:0/18:1). Up to 20% of term lung PC was PC14:0/16:0. The temporal increase in rodent lung PC saturation began later in gestation than the human, and in the rat a significant increase in PC saturation only occurred postnatally. In this respect the guinea pig more closely resembled the human. For each mammal, a ratio of whole lung PC16:0/16:0 to PC16:0/18:1 (the P/O ratio) provided a sensitive marker of fetal lung maturity. The PC composition of whole adult lung and its saturation enrichment in bronchoalveolar lavage samples were similar in human, guinea pig and rat. We propose that the guinea pig provides a useful model for human lung prematurity studies.
0378-3782
157-171
Hunt, A.N.
95a3e223-da96-40e7-b47d-27dce014e305
Kelly, F.J.
8eda554f-c23c-4321-b5e2-b99a72dfd0aa
Postle, A.D.
0fa17988-b4a0-4cdc-819a-9ae15c5dad66
Hunt, A.N.
95a3e223-da96-40e7-b47d-27dce014e305
Kelly, F.J.
8eda554f-c23c-4321-b5e2-b99a72dfd0aa
Postle, A.D.
0fa17988-b4a0-4cdc-819a-9ae15c5dad66

Hunt, A.N., Kelly, F.J. and Postle, A.D. (1991) Developmental variation in whole human lung phosphatidylcholine molecular species: A comparison with guinea pig and rat. Early Human Development, 25 (3), 157-171. (doi:10.1016/0378-3782(91)90112-G).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Detailed analysis of the pattern of human and rodent lung phosphatidylcholine (PC) species during fetal development revealed a progressive increase in two disaturated species. The rise in the fractional content of dipalmitoyl PC (PC16:0/16:0) and myristoylpalmitoyl PC (PC14:0/16:0) was accompanied at each time point by a fall of similar magnitude in palmitoyloleoyl PC (PC16:0/18:1). Up to 20% of term lung PC was PC14:0/16:0. The temporal increase in rodent lung PC saturation began later in gestation than the human, and in the rat a significant increase in PC saturation only occurred postnatally. In this respect the guinea pig more closely resembled the human. For each mammal, a ratio of whole lung PC16:0/16:0 to PC16:0/18:1 (the P/O ratio) provided a sensitive marker of fetal lung maturity. The PC composition of whole adult lung and its saturation enrichment in bronchoalveolar lavage samples were similar in human, guinea pig and rat. We propose that the guinea pig provides a useful model for human lung prematurity studies.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 March 1991
Published date: 1 June 1991

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468593
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468593
ISSN: 0378-3782
PURE UUID: 21120d81-68bb-4d0e-bb4c-65d432c62761
ORCID for A.N. Hunt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5938-2152
ORCID for A.D. Postle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7361-0756

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Date deposited: 18 Aug 2022 16:42
Last modified: 19 Aug 2022 01:33

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Contributors

Author: A.N. Hunt ORCID iD
Author: F.J. Kelly
Author: A.D. Postle ORCID iD

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