The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Controlled and automatic influences of multiple choice testing

Controlled and automatic influences of multiple choice testing
Controlled and automatic influences of multiple choice testing
Multiple-choice (MC) practice tests can enhance later test performance, especially when accompanied by corrective feedback. However, feedback can sometimes be erroneously endorsed if MC questions are related to practice questions but have different answers. This study investigated the role of corrective feedback and false recognition in producing this impairment. Experiment 1 showed that providing feedback on the practice test impaired later related-item performance more than when no feedback was provided. Experiment 2 showed that related-item impairment only occurred when participants believed the related questions were repeated. Experiment 2 also ascertained the nature of the mechanism driving the impairment with opposition instructions. Specifically, participants were told that there were questions related to those on the practice test, but that the answers were never the same. These instructions had minimal effect on performance, suggesting that the impairment is caused by automatic false recognition.
Keywords: multiple-choice, testing effect, controlled and automatic memory influences, familiarity, false recognition.
University of Southampton
Alamri, Aeshah
a8757c26-2bb4-44fb-9207-977653524719
Alamri, Aeshah
a8757c26-2bb4-44fb-9207-977653524719
Higham, Philip
4093b28f-7d58-4d18-89d4-021792e418e7
Wildschut, Tim
4452a61d-1649-4c4a-bb1d-154ec446ff81

Alamri, Aeshah (2022) Controlled and automatic influences of multiple choice testing. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 257pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Multiple-choice (MC) practice tests can enhance later test performance, especially when accompanied by corrective feedback. However, feedback can sometimes be erroneously endorsed if MC questions are related to practice questions but have different answers. This study investigated the role of corrective feedback and false recognition in producing this impairment. Experiment 1 showed that providing feedback on the practice test impaired later related-item performance more than when no feedback was provided. Experiment 2 showed that related-item impairment only occurred when participants believed the related questions were repeated. Experiment 2 also ascertained the nature of the mechanism driving the impairment with opposition instructions. Specifically, participants were told that there were questions related to those on the practice test, but that the answers were never the same. These instructions had minimal effect on performance, suggesting that the impairment is caused by automatic false recognition.
Keywords: multiple-choice, testing effect, controlled and automatic memory influences, familiarity, false recognition.

Text
Aeshah Alamri PhD thesis - final copy unsigned - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (1MB)
Text
Aeshah Alamri Permission to deposit thesis form
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Published date: 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468607
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468607
PURE UUID: 7eff3c00-3164-472d-92e7-7199945311cb
ORCID for Philip Higham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6087-7224

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Aug 2022 16:42
Last modified: 19 Aug 2022 01:36

Export record

Contributors

Author: Aeshah Alamri
Thesis advisor: Philip Higham ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Tim Wildschut

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×