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Linking nutrition to long-term health: Epigenetic mechanisms

Linking nutrition to long-term health: Epigenetic mechanisms
Linking nutrition to long-term health: Epigenetic mechanisms
Nutritional intake during key developmental windows in early life has increasingly been linked to long-term health trajectories and the risk of non-communicable disease. The mechanisms by which early-life environment can influence later phenotypes and long-term disease risk has been suggested to include epigenetic processes. Epigenetic processes modulate gene expression without a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, determining when and where a gene is expressed. Both maternal and paternal diet have been shown to induce epigenetic changes in the offspring, leading to changes in gene expression that can persist throughout the life course and influence later disease susceptibility. This has led in recent years to the identification of epigenetic markers for lifestyle-related disease risk being investigated as potential therapeutic biomarkers. Elucidation of such modifiable epigenetic processes linked to non-communicable disease risk may enable early intervention strategies using targeted approaches through nutrition or pharmacological epigenetic modifiers to improve long-term health.
257 - 277
Woodhead Publishing
Burton, Mark
250319ad-90dc-4651-b118-d5dbe5eaafa6
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Lillycrop, Karen
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Saavedra, Jose M.
Dattilo, Anne M.
Burton, Mark
250319ad-90dc-4651-b118-d5dbe5eaafa6
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Lillycrop, Karen
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Saavedra, Jose M.
Dattilo, Anne M.

Burton, Mark, Godfrey, Keith and Lillycrop, Karen (2022) Linking nutrition to long-term health: Epigenetic mechanisms. In, Saavedra, Jose M. and Dattilo, Anne M. (eds.) Early Nutrition and Long-Term Health. Second ed. Woodhead Publishing, 257 - 277. (doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-824389-3.00017-9).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Nutritional intake during key developmental windows in early life has increasingly been linked to long-term health trajectories and the risk of non-communicable disease. The mechanisms by which early-life environment can influence later phenotypes and long-term disease risk has been suggested to include epigenetic processes. Epigenetic processes modulate gene expression without a change in the DNA nucleotide sequence, determining when and where a gene is expressed. Both maternal and paternal diet have been shown to induce epigenetic changes in the offspring, leading to changes in gene expression that can persist throughout the life course and influence later disease susceptibility. This has led in recent years to the identification of epigenetic markers for lifestyle-related disease risk being investigated as potential therapeutic biomarkers. Elucidation of such modifiable epigenetic processes linked to non-communicable disease risk may enable early intervention strategies using targeted approaches through nutrition or pharmacological epigenetic modifiers to improve long-term health.

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More information

Published date: August 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 468816
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/468816
PURE UUID: d0ca4745-e253-4446-9ea4-4f639c589ba4
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Karen Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Aug 2022 16:40
Last modified: 27 Aug 2022 01:35

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Contributors

Author: Mark Burton
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Karen Lillycrop ORCID iD
Editor: Jose M. Saavedra
Editor: Anne M. Dattilo

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