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Acquired tastes: an exploration of foodways in late iron age south east England

Acquired tastes: an exploration of foodways in late iron age south east England
Acquired tastes: an exploration of foodways in late iron age south east England
This thesis explores the foodways, culinary cultures and social contexts of food and drink consumption engaged in by communities in south east England during the Late Iron Age, c. 150 BC – AD 43. This was a period of rapid social, cultural, economic and political change, with the emergence of novel forms of mortuary rites, settlement types, hierarchical organisation and material culture. Against this precarious and dynamic backdrop, the archaeological record hints at developments in foodways, consumption habits, eating- and drinking-related material culture, and social and political uses of food and drink, some of which were enabled in part by intensifying relationships between Britain and the Roman and Gallic worlds. This research attempts to deconstruct and contextualise some of these developments and is founded upon a synthesis of multiple lines of evidence, including indigenous and imported pottery, charred plants, human and animal skeletal remains, the results of stable isotope and residue analysis and small finds, from settlement and mortuary contexts. These assemblages are integrated and used to investigate the technologies and practices implicated in each stage of the foodway and to explore how different demographics engaged with what they ate. Taking this historical context as an example of a colonial frontier, indigenous culinary cultures, social and political uses of food, and the role that food played in the expression of complex frontier identities and in the negotiation of indigenous-Roman interactions are contextualised through a comparison with indigenous-European interactions in the colonial Great Lakes region during the eighteenth century. The results of these investigations serve to suggest new interpretations of Iron Age foodways and the adoption of Roman practices and material culture. These new interpretations emphasise indigenous creativity, experimentation and agency, and lend support to the conceptual framework of the colonial ‘middle ground’.
University of Southampton
Enayat, Misha Rochelle
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Enayat, Misha Rochelle
a2ad6938-0927-48e3-8350-26078a254def
Revell, Louise
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Champion, Timothy
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Enayat, Misha Rochelle (2022) Acquired tastes: an exploration of foodways in late iron age south east England. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 279pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis explores the foodways, culinary cultures and social contexts of food and drink consumption engaged in by communities in south east England during the Late Iron Age, c. 150 BC – AD 43. This was a period of rapid social, cultural, economic and political change, with the emergence of novel forms of mortuary rites, settlement types, hierarchical organisation and material culture. Against this precarious and dynamic backdrop, the archaeological record hints at developments in foodways, consumption habits, eating- and drinking-related material culture, and social and political uses of food and drink, some of which were enabled in part by intensifying relationships between Britain and the Roman and Gallic worlds. This research attempts to deconstruct and contextualise some of these developments and is founded upon a synthesis of multiple lines of evidence, including indigenous and imported pottery, charred plants, human and animal skeletal remains, the results of stable isotope and residue analysis and small finds, from settlement and mortuary contexts. These assemblages are integrated and used to investigate the technologies and practices implicated in each stage of the foodway and to explore how different demographics engaged with what they ate. Taking this historical context as an example of a colonial frontier, indigenous culinary cultures, social and political uses of food, and the role that food played in the expression of complex frontier identities and in the negotiation of indigenous-Roman interactions are contextualised through a comparison with indigenous-European interactions in the colonial Great Lakes region during the eighteenth century. The results of these investigations serve to suggest new interpretations of Iron Age foodways and the adoption of Roman practices and material culture. These new interpretations emphasise indigenous creativity, experimentation and agency, and lend support to the conceptual framework of the colonial ‘middle ground’.

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PhD Thesis_Misha Enayat - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 23 July 2025.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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PTDF_Misha Enayat
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: May 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469174
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469174
PURE UUID: cecfc324-eb7f-4d78-88e9-690960a55402

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Sep 2022 17:07
Last modified: 08 Sep 2022 17:07

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Contributors

Author: Misha Rochelle Enayat
Thesis advisor: Louise Revell
Thesis advisor: Timothy Champion

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