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Environmental DNA reveals a multi‐taxa biogeographic break across the Arabian Sea and Sea of Oman

Environmental DNA reveals a multi‐taxa biogeographic break across the Arabian Sea and Sea of Oman
Environmental DNA reveals a multi‐taxa biogeographic break across the Arabian Sea and Sea of Oman
Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly being used to assess community composition in marine ecosystems. Applying eDNA approaches across broad spatial scales now provide the potential to inform biogeographic analyses. However, to date, few studies have employed this technique to assess broad biogeographic patterns across multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we compare eDNA-derived communities of bony fishes and invertebrates, including corals and sponges, from 15 locations spanning the entire length of the Omani coast. This survey includes a variety of habitats, including coral and rocky reefs, and covers three distinct marine ecoregions. Our data support a known biogeographic break in fish communities between the north and the south of Oman; however, the eDNA data highlight that this faunal break is mostly reflected in schooling baitfish species (e.g., sardines and anchovies), whereas reef-associated fish communities appear more homogeneous along this coastline. Furthermore, our data provide indications that these biogeographic breaks also affect invertebrate communities, which includes corals, sponges, and broader eukaryotic groups. The observed community shifts were correlated with local environmental and anthropogenic differences characteristic of this coastline, particularly for the eDNA-derived bony fish communities. Overall, this study provides compelling support that eDNA sequencing and associated analyses may serve as powerful tools to detect community differences across biogeographic breaks and ecoregions, particularly in places where there is significant variation in oceanographic conditions or anthropogenic impacts.
206-221
DiBattista, Joseph D.
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Berumen, Michael L
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Priest, Mark A
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De Brauwer, Maarten
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Coker, Darren J.
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Sinclair‐Taylor, Tane H
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Hay, Amanda
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Bruss, Gerd
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Mansour, Shawky
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Bunce, Michael
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Goatley, Christopher Harry Robert
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Power, Matthew
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Marshell, Alyssa
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DiBattista, Joseph D.
b175300e-0a7c-4016-bd82-efb4015bfc13
Berumen, Michael L
741562b1-d1cd-43d6-a291-5529e5ae22d8
Priest, Mark A
2aa099d4-c581-467c-867e-a8c55adbd2ee
De Brauwer, Maarten
0fece919-5d12-4a1d-b5c3-94dd790adc04
Coker, Darren J.
b58bd0da-f541-4c86-92c1-b6b8cdf7d872
Sinclair‐Taylor, Tane H
6641b3b5-2e97-4713-8451-6db494e8e37b
Hay, Amanda
5ffe6187-66ca-4780-bb35-c257ef4c9597
Bruss, Gerd
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Mansour, Shawky
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Bunce, Michael
941e9b18-866b-4433-ad8e-4b20df90bde0
Goatley, Christopher Harry Robert
b158dc1a-76f3-4ace-9d33-260d8c76ac93
Power, Matthew
1ada75bd-1dd0-4669-bc83-65cbcd4a66e7
Marshell, Alyssa
bb0e462c-58b0-4023-9dcc-3e9c66f5d0a7

DiBattista, Joseph D., Berumen, Michael L, Priest, Mark A, De Brauwer, Maarten, Coker, Darren J., Sinclair‐Taylor, Tane H, Hay, Amanda, Bruss, Gerd, Mansour, Shawky, Bunce, Michael, Goatley, Christopher Harry Robert, Power, Matthew and Marshell, Alyssa (2022) Environmental DNA reveals a multi‐taxa biogeographic break across the Arabian Sea and Sea of Oman. Environmental DNA, 4 (1), 206-221. (doi:10.1002/edn3.252).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is increasingly being used to assess community composition in marine ecosystems. Applying eDNA approaches across broad spatial scales now provide the potential to inform biogeographic analyses. However, to date, few studies have employed this technique to assess broad biogeographic patterns across multiple taxonomic groups. Here, we compare eDNA-derived communities of bony fishes and invertebrates, including corals and sponges, from 15 locations spanning the entire length of the Omani coast. This survey includes a variety of habitats, including coral and rocky reefs, and covers three distinct marine ecoregions. Our data support a known biogeographic break in fish communities between the north and the south of Oman; however, the eDNA data highlight that this faunal break is mostly reflected in schooling baitfish species (e.g., sardines and anchovies), whereas reef-associated fish communities appear more homogeneous along this coastline. Furthermore, our data provide indications that these biogeographic breaks also affect invertebrate communities, which includes corals, sponges, and broader eukaryotic groups. The observed community shifts were correlated with local environmental and anthropogenic differences characteristic of this coastline, particularly for the eDNA-derived bony fish communities. Overall, this study provides compelling support that eDNA sequencing and associated analyses may serve as powerful tools to detect community differences across biogeographic breaks and ecoregions, particularly in places where there is significant variation in oceanographic conditions or anthropogenic impacts.

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Published date: 1 January 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469186
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469186
PURE UUID: 02afdd2e-1425-451e-835d-9a6f0d9c5ec8
ORCID for Christopher Harry Robert Goatley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2930-5591

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Date deposited: 08 Sep 2022 17:10
Last modified: 10 Sep 2022 02:06

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Contributors

Author: Joseph D. DiBattista
Author: Michael L Berumen
Author: Mark A Priest
Author: Maarten De Brauwer
Author: Darren J. Coker
Author: Tane H Sinclair‐Taylor
Author: Amanda Hay
Author: Gerd Bruss
Author: Shawky Mansour
Author: Michael Bunce
Author: Christopher Harry Robert Goatley ORCID iD
Author: Matthew Power
Author: Alyssa Marshell

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