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Direct outcomes and win-win relationships between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters

Direct outcomes and win-win relationships between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters
Direct outcomes and win-win relationships between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters
The purpose of our paper is to apply the state progress checklist from direct outcomes theory to a new domain of the university-to-work transition to mediate a dyadic win-win relationship between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters. The state progress checklist incorporates three endeavour elements - (i) potential, (ii) agendas, and (iii) effects; and nine themes - (i) resources, (ii) motivations, (iii) interactions, (iv) assumptions, (v) scenarios, (vi) plans, (vii) actions, (viii) outcomes, and (ix) reuses. The endeavour elements and themes are systematically applied to help envision, pursue, and achieve mutually beneficial relationships between both parties. The application of direct outcomes theory as a mediator of the relationship between university careers services and graduate recruiters offers synergy effects for both parties and helps overcome pre-existing barriers to collaboration and communication. Our paper applies the state progress checklist from direct outcomes theory to a new domain of the university-to-work transition to bridge research agendas across the education, vocational behaviour, and human resource management literature. We identify opportunities for university careers services and graduate recruiters to foster a win-win relationship by aligning their objectives and through the provision and receiving of support. These benefits subsequently transcend additional stakeholders, including university students, universities, and organisations. Moreover, Appendix 1 provides a summary sheet offering some potential questions for each of the nine themes across the three endeavour elements. These example questions are not meant to be an exhaustive list. Their purpose is to act as a starting point for discussion and action. The university careers advisors and graduate recruiters could initially work through this sheet separately before working through the sheet a second time collaboratively.
9-25
Buckholtz, Thomas J.
99b253dc-2c4d-437a-a0ee-f124b0f2ab25
Donald, William E.
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a
Buckholtz, Thomas J.
99b253dc-2c4d-437a-a0ee-f124b0f2ab25
Donald, William E.
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a

Buckholtz, Thomas J. and Donald, William E. (2022) Direct outcomes and win-win relationships between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters. GiLE Journal of Skills Development, 2 (1), 9-25. (doi:10.52398/gjsd.2022.v2.i1.pp9-25).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The purpose of our paper is to apply the state progress checklist from direct outcomes theory to a new domain of the university-to-work transition to mediate a dyadic win-win relationship between university careers advisors and graduate recruiters. The state progress checklist incorporates three endeavour elements - (i) potential, (ii) agendas, and (iii) effects; and nine themes - (i) resources, (ii) motivations, (iii) interactions, (iv) assumptions, (v) scenarios, (vi) plans, (vii) actions, (viii) outcomes, and (ix) reuses. The endeavour elements and themes are systematically applied to help envision, pursue, and achieve mutually beneficial relationships between both parties. The application of direct outcomes theory as a mediator of the relationship between university careers services and graduate recruiters offers synergy effects for both parties and helps overcome pre-existing barriers to collaboration and communication. Our paper applies the state progress checklist from direct outcomes theory to a new domain of the university-to-work transition to bridge research agendas across the education, vocational behaviour, and human resource management literature. We identify opportunities for university careers services and graduate recruiters to foster a win-win relationship by aligning their objectives and through the provision and receiving of support. These benefits subsequently transcend additional stakeholders, including university students, universities, and organisations. Moreover, Appendix 1 provides a summary sheet offering some potential questions for each of the nine themes across the three endeavour elements. These example questions are not meant to be an exhaustive list. Their purpose is to act as a starting point for discussion and action. The university careers advisors and graduate recruiters could initially work through this sheet separately before working through the sheet a second time collaboratively.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2022
Published date: 13 May 2022

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469518
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469518
PURE UUID: d1fb8339-f729-44f9-b55b-62296abb74dd

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Date deposited: 16 Sep 2022 16:43
Last modified: 16 Sep 2022 16:44

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Contributors

Author: Thomas J. Buckholtz
Author: William E. Donald

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