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Heat and cold sensitivity in multiple sclerosis: A patient-centred perspective on triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices

Heat and cold sensitivity in multiple sclerosis: A patient-centred perspective on triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices
Heat and cold sensitivity in multiple sclerosis: A patient-centred perspective on triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices
Background: The negative effects of heat and cold on Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have been known for ∼100 years. Yet, we lack patient-centred investigations on temperature sensitivity in persons with MS (pwMS).

Objectives: To evaluate triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices of temperature sensitivity pwMS via a dedicated survey.

Methods: 757 pwMS completed an online survey assessing the subjective experience of temperature sensitivity. We performed descriptive statistics and regression analyses to evaluate association between individual factors and susceptibility/resilience to thermal stress.

Results: Temperature sensitivity varied significantly in pwMS, with 58% of participants being heat sensitive only; 29% heat and cold sensitive; and 13% cold sensitive only (p<0.001). Yet, all pwMS: i) experienced hot and cold days as primary triggers; ii) reported fatigue as the most common worsening symptom, impacting walking and concentration; iii) used air conditioning and changes in clothing insulation as primary thermal resilience practices. Furthermore, certain individual factors (i.e. age, level of motor disability, experience of fatigue) were predictive of greater susceptibility to certain triggers (e.g. hot days) and symptoms (e.g. fatigue).

Conclusion: Patient-centred evidence on the impact of and response to temperature sensitivity could play an important role in the development of individualised healthcare plans for temperature-sensitive pwMS.

Keywords: Impact; Multiple sclerosis; Strategies; Symptoms; Temperature sensitivity; Triggers.
Impact, Multiple sclerosis, Strategies, Symptoms, Temperature sensitivity, Triggers
2211-0348
Christogianni, Aikaterini
696c8a6c-30d6-4fb1-b7e4-70d45997180b
O'Garro, Jamine
f3738299-e327-4990-aabe-7b3c9a8ab1c0
Bibb, Richard
37471e59-8b0b-4caa-9917-cba0c546e27d
Filtness, Ashley
d804192b-424f-406b-a4e4-176bb251cf16
Filingeri, Davide
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24
Christogianni, Aikaterini
696c8a6c-30d6-4fb1-b7e4-70d45997180b
O'Garro, Jamine
f3738299-e327-4990-aabe-7b3c9a8ab1c0
Bibb, Richard
37471e59-8b0b-4caa-9917-cba0c546e27d
Filtness, Ashley
d804192b-424f-406b-a4e4-176bb251cf16
Filingeri, Davide
42502a34-e7e6-4b49-b304-ce2ae0bf7b24

Christogianni, Aikaterini, O'Garro, Jamine, Bibb, Richard, Filtness, Ashley and Filingeri, Davide (2022) Heat and cold sensitivity in multiple sclerosis: A patient-centred perspective on triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 67, [104075]. (doi:10.1016/j.msard.2022.104075).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The negative effects of heat and cold on Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have been known for ∼100 years. Yet, we lack patient-centred investigations on temperature sensitivity in persons with MS (pwMS).

Objectives: To evaluate triggers, symptoms, and thermal resilience practices of temperature sensitivity pwMS via a dedicated survey.

Methods: 757 pwMS completed an online survey assessing the subjective experience of temperature sensitivity. We performed descriptive statistics and regression analyses to evaluate association between individual factors and susceptibility/resilience to thermal stress.

Results: Temperature sensitivity varied significantly in pwMS, with 58% of participants being heat sensitive only; 29% heat and cold sensitive; and 13% cold sensitive only (p<0.001). Yet, all pwMS: i) experienced hot and cold days as primary triggers; ii) reported fatigue as the most common worsening symptom, impacting walking and concentration; iii) used air conditioning and changes in clothing insulation as primary thermal resilience practices. Furthermore, certain individual factors (i.e. age, level of motor disability, experience of fatigue) were predictive of greater susceptibility to certain triggers (e.g. hot days) and symptoms (e.g. fatigue).

Conclusion: Patient-centred evidence on the impact of and response to temperature sensitivity could play an important role in the development of individualised healthcare plans for temperature-sensitive pwMS.

Keywords: Impact; Multiple sclerosis; Strategies; Symptoms; Temperature sensitivity; Triggers.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 July 2022
Keywords: Impact, Multiple sclerosis, Strategies, Symptoms, Temperature sensitivity, Triggers

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469558
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469558
ISSN: 2211-0348
PURE UUID: 8a81ab20-0402-4071-9c0f-64a825e951dc
ORCID for Davide Filingeri: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5652-395X

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Date deposited: 20 Sep 2022 16:36
Last modified: 24 Sep 2022 02:03

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Contributors

Author: Aikaterini Christogianni
Author: Jamine O'Garro
Author: Richard Bibb
Author: Ashley Filtness

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