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A case-control and seven-year longitudinal neurocognitive study of adults with sickle cell disease in Ghana

A case-control and seven-year longitudinal neurocognitive study of adults with sickle cell disease in Ghana
A case-control and seven-year longitudinal neurocognitive study of adults with sickle cell disease in Ghana

Ageing in sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a myriad of end-organ complications, including cerebrovascular damage and cognitive impairment (CI). Although CI is very common in SCD, little is known about cognitive functioning and how it changes with age. This study examines cognitive patterns of 63 adults with SCD and 60 non-SCD, age- and education-matched controls in Ghana. Of those adults with SCD, 34 completed the neuropsychological battery at baseline and again seven years later. In cross-sectional data, adults with SCD performed worse than controls in all cognitive test domains (p < 0.01 for all). The seven-year follow-up data showed that the group exhibited a significant decline in visuospatial abilities (ranging from Cohen's d = 1.40 to 2.38), and to a lesser extent, in processing speed and executive functioning. Exploratory analyses showed a significant time-by-education interaction, indicating that education may be protective from decline in cognitive performance. These findings have implications for clinical practice. Early neuropsychological surveillance coupled with early assessment and remedial programmes will provide avenues for enhancing the quality of life of adults living with SCD in Ghana.

cognitive functioning, longitudinal studies, neurocognitive test, psychology, psychosocial, sickle cell disease
0007-1048
411-426
Ampomah, Mary A
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Drake, Jermon A
91a25797-a3c0-464e-8b37-8538d9b0ee53
Anum, Adote
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Amponsah, Benjamin
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Dei-Adomakoh, Yvonne
36bdff73-895d-4177-8c8b-62c5a6cdcae3
Anie, Kofi
4173ca22-5614-4671-948c-84f063e992cc
Mate-Kole, Christopher C
43733f72-c60f-44ab-b11d-ee922d077550
Jonassaint, Charles R
c744c34a-6692-46c7-b509-e1f3d7801d64
Kirkham, Fenella J
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Ampomah, Mary A
64ceb900-4960-4685-83cb-35fa34a8a3ab
Drake, Jermon A
91a25797-a3c0-464e-8b37-8538d9b0ee53
Anum, Adote
0dc77686-f4f8-468f-b420-f1243992aee3
Amponsah, Benjamin
e523b60f-56cf-4c01-81b3-6ec301681b55
Dei-Adomakoh, Yvonne
36bdff73-895d-4177-8c8b-62c5a6cdcae3
Anie, Kofi
4173ca22-5614-4671-948c-84f063e992cc
Mate-Kole, Christopher C
43733f72-c60f-44ab-b11d-ee922d077550
Jonassaint, Charles R
c744c34a-6692-46c7-b509-e1f3d7801d64
Kirkham, Fenella J
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58

Ampomah, Mary A, Drake, Jermon A, Anum, Adote, Amponsah, Benjamin, Dei-Adomakoh, Yvonne, Anie, Kofi, Mate-Kole, Christopher C, Jonassaint, Charles R and Kirkham, Fenella J (2022) A case-control and seven-year longitudinal neurocognitive study of adults with sickle cell disease in Ghana. British Journal of Haematology, 199 (3), 411-426. (doi:10.1111/bjh.18386).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ageing in sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a myriad of end-organ complications, including cerebrovascular damage and cognitive impairment (CI). Although CI is very common in SCD, little is known about cognitive functioning and how it changes with age. This study examines cognitive patterns of 63 adults with SCD and 60 non-SCD, age- and education-matched controls in Ghana. Of those adults with SCD, 34 completed the neuropsychological battery at baseline and again seven years later. In cross-sectional data, adults with SCD performed worse than controls in all cognitive test domains (p < 0.01 for all). The seven-year follow-up data showed that the group exhibited a significant decline in visuospatial abilities (ranging from Cohen's d = 1.40 to 2.38), and to a lesser extent, in processing speed and executive functioning. Exploratory analyses showed a significant time-by-education interaction, indicating that education may be protective from decline in cognitive performance. These findings have implications for clinical practice. Early neuropsychological surveillance coupled with early assessment and remedial programmes will provide avenues for enhancing the quality of life of adults living with SCD in Ghana.

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Br J Haematol - 2022 - Ampomah - A case‐control and seven‐year longitudinal neurocognitive study of adults with sickle cell - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 17 July 2022
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 August 2022
Additional Information: © 2022 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by British Society for Haematology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Keywords: cognitive functioning, longitudinal studies, neurocognitive test, psychology, psychosocial, sickle cell disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469874
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469874
ISSN: 0007-1048
PURE UUID: dc5e774e-df99-441a-a22c-1198a1f2840f
ORCID for Fenella J Kirkham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2443-7958

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Date deposited: 27 Sep 2022 17:10
Last modified: 10 Nov 2022 02:36

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Contributors

Author: Mary A Ampomah
Author: Jermon A Drake
Author: Adote Anum
Author: Benjamin Amponsah
Author: Yvonne Dei-Adomakoh
Author: Kofi Anie
Author: Christopher C Mate-Kole
Author: Charles R Jonassaint

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