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Acceptability of a brief fatigue intervention for inflammatory arthritis: a qualitative process evaluation

Acceptability of a brief fatigue intervention for inflammatory arthritis: a qualitative process evaluation
Acceptability of a brief fatigue intervention for inflammatory arthritis: a qualitative process evaluation
Objectives
We developed a brief cognitive behavioural, one-to-one intervention to reduce fatigue impact for patients with inflammatory arthritis. This qualitative process evaluation explored intervention acceptability and potential refinements from the perspective of patients who attended sessions and rheumatology health professionals (RHPs) who delivered the intervention.

Methods
Interviews were conducted with patients and RHPs from five National Health Service (NHS) sites. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results
Twenty-two patients and 11 RHPs participated.

Patient themes
Collaborative, non-judgemental consultations: patients valued having space to reflect, where their fatigue was validated. Relevant content, but not ground-breaking: patients appreciated the opportunity to tailor content to individual priorities. Daily diaries were useful to visualize fatigue. Self-awareness: patients reported increased acceptance, sense of control, and confidence to manage fatigue. Degrees of openness to change: sessions prompted patients to engage in behaviour change. For some, complicated lives made it difficult to plan for change.

RHP themes
Engagement with intervention: RHPs liked training face to face, and sessions were more enjoyable with experience of delivery. Research vs clinical practice: RHPs expressed concern about fitting sessions into NHS clinic appointments. It was difficult to offer follow-up sessions within 2 weeks. Collaborating with patients: RHPs reported that patients engaged with the tools and strategies. Some RHPs followed the manual in a linear way, whereas others used it flexibly.

Conclusion
There is potential for this brief fatigue intervention to benefit patients. Future research will focus on flexibility to fit with local services and creating educational resources to use in a range of contexts.
Fatigue, acceptability, brief intervention, cognitive behavioural, inflammatory arthritis, process evaluation, rheumatology, self-efficacy
Berry, Alice
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Bridgewater, Susan
ce8959e2-2ea8-4619-886e-af40b28a34b0
Abbott, Bryan
86df665f-5e78-4be8-a50f-bc567ceffe3d
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Dures, Emma
feaebb8b-77b9-4041-9a16-15d312c5696b
Berry, Alice
9a9bff4d-ac8b-43a4-954b-c9891f92a1fd
Bridgewater, Susan
ce8959e2-2ea8-4619-886e-af40b28a34b0
Abbott, Bryan
86df665f-5e78-4be8-a50f-bc567ceffe3d
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Dures, Emma
feaebb8b-77b9-4041-9a16-15d312c5696b

Berry, Alice, Bridgewater, Susan, Abbott, Bryan, Adams, Joanna and Dures, Emma (2022) Acceptability of a brief fatigue intervention for inflammatory arthritis: a qualitative process evaluation. Rheumatology Advances in Practice, 6 (2). (doi:10.1093/rap/rkac064).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
We developed a brief cognitive behavioural, one-to-one intervention to reduce fatigue impact for patients with inflammatory arthritis. This qualitative process evaluation explored intervention acceptability and potential refinements from the perspective of patients who attended sessions and rheumatology health professionals (RHPs) who delivered the intervention.

Methods
Interviews were conducted with patients and RHPs from five National Health Service (NHS) sites. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Results
Twenty-two patients and 11 RHPs participated.

Patient themes
Collaborative, non-judgemental consultations: patients valued having space to reflect, where their fatigue was validated. Relevant content, but not ground-breaking: patients appreciated the opportunity to tailor content to individual priorities. Daily diaries were useful to visualize fatigue. Self-awareness: patients reported increased acceptance, sense of control, and confidence to manage fatigue. Degrees of openness to change: sessions prompted patients to engage in behaviour change. For some, complicated lives made it difficult to plan for change.

RHP themes
Engagement with intervention: RHPs liked training face to face, and sessions were more enjoyable with experience of delivery. Research vs clinical practice: RHPs expressed concern about fitting sessions into NHS clinic appointments. It was difficult to offer follow-up sessions within 2 weeks. Collaborating with patients: RHPs reported that patients engaged with the tools and strategies. Some RHPs followed the manual in a linear way, whereas others used it flexibly.

Conclusion
There is potential for this brief fatigue intervention to benefit patients. Future research will focus on flexibility to fit with local services and creating educational resources to use in a range of contexts.

Text
Acceptability of a brief fatigue intervention for inflammatory arthritis - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2022
Published date: 16 August 2022
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.
Keywords: Fatigue, acceptability, brief intervention, cognitive behavioural, inflammatory arthritis, process evaluation, rheumatology, self-efficacy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 469882
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/469882
PURE UUID: b77f585d-fcd3-4849-8bc0-ba0ad093b837
ORCID for Joanna Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1765-7060

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Sep 2022 17:14
Last modified: 28 Sep 2022 01:34

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Contributors

Author: Alice Berry
Author: Susan Bridgewater
Author: Bryan Abbott
Author: Joanna Adams ORCID iD
Author: Emma Dures

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