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Trade and dietary preferences can determine micronutrient security in the United Kingdom

Trade and dietary preferences can determine micronutrient security in the United Kingdom
Trade and dietary preferences can determine micronutrient security in the United Kingdom
Food production, dietary choices, climate change, trade tariffs and future responses to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic are some of the factors affecting global food security. Here we examine how micronutrient security has varied in the United Kingdom from 1961 to 2017, before Brexit, taking supply and demand driver changes into account. We also introduce future scenarios to see how a more plant-based diet and/or differing trade arrangement post-European Union exit and COVID-19 pandemic could affect the supply of nutrients. Results show that trading agreements have affected several key micronutrients during the past 60 years and are likely to be influential in a post-Brexit United Kingdom. Changes in dietary patterns, which influence how much animal- and plant-based products are consumed, have also affected micronutrient security and are likely to do so in the future with increased interest in consuming a more plant-based diet.
512–522
Baverstock, Jenny
82f3fd4c-2b09-4c0d-8485-15afbc53be59
Poppy, Guy
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Baverstock-Poppy, Joseph James
ce709cbb-28e9-4fee-ac9d-a9753407abe2
Baverstock, Jenny
82f3fd4c-2b09-4c0d-8485-15afbc53be59
Poppy, Guy
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Baverstock-Poppy, Joseph James
ce709cbb-28e9-4fee-ac9d-a9753407abe2

Baverstock, Jenny, Poppy, Guy and Baverstock-Poppy, Joseph James (2022) Trade and dietary preferences can determine micronutrient security in the United Kingdom. Nature Food, 3 (7), 512–522. (doi:10.1038/s43016-022-00538-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Food production, dietary choices, climate change, trade tariffs and future responses to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic are some of the factors affecting global food security. Here we examine how micronutrient security has varied in the United Kingdom from 1961 to 2017, before Brexit, taking supply and demand driver changes into account. We also introduce future scenarios to see how a more plant-based diet and/or differing trade arrangement post-European Union exit and COVID-19 pandemic could affect the supply of nutrients. Results show that trading agreements have affected several key micronutrients during the past 60 years and are likely to be influential in a post-Brexit United Kingdom. Changes in dietary patterns, which influence how much animal- and plant-based products are consumed, have also affected micronutrient security and are likely to do so in the future with increased interest in consuming a more plant-based diet.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 May 2022
Published date: 14 July 2022
Additional Information: Funding Information: We thank the FSA for access to its data trade visualization app. G.M.P. thanks the FSA for discussions on the future of the UK food system and colleagues in the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) research community for discussions on food systems and scenario analysis. Publisher Copyright: © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 470327
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/470327
PURE UUID: 04244b3a-4c0b-4063-893a-b7f21fd0f33d
ORCID for Jenny Baverstock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1777-2894

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Date deposited: 06 Oct 2022 16:51
Last modified: 14 Jan 2023 05:01

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Author: Guy Poppy
Author: Joseph James Baverstock-Poppy

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